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Balint Reczey: Migrating from Bazaar to Git on Launchpad just got easier!

Sht, 24/11/2018 - 11:48md

Debian recently switched from Alioth to Salsa offering only Git hosting from now on and that simplifies the work of exiting contributors and also helps newcomers who are most likely already familiar with Git if they know at least one version control system. (Thanks to everyone involved in the transition!)

On Ubuntu’s side, most Ubuntu-specific packages and big part of Ubuntu’s infrastructure used to be maintained in Bazaar repositories in the past. Since then Git became the most widely used version control system but the Bazaar repositories did not fully disappear.

There are still hundreds of packages maintained in Bazaar in Ubuntu (packaging repositories in Bazaar by team) and Debian (lintian report) and maintaining them in Git instead could be easier in the long term.

Launchpad already supports Git and there are guidelines for converting Bazaar repositories to Git (1,2),  but if you would like to make the switch I suggest taking a look at bzr-git-mass-convert based on bzr fast-export (verifying the result with git-remote-bzr). It is a simple tool for merging multiple Bazaar branches to a single git repository set up for pushing it back to Launchpad.

We (at the Foundations Team) use it for migrating our repositories and there is also a wiki page for tracking the migration schedule of popular repositories.

LoCo Ubuntu PT: Ho Ho Ho! O Pai Natal chegou mais cedo

Pre, 23/11/2018 - 1:35md

Olá!

Trazemos ótimas novidades para a Comunidade! Acabamos de encomendar camisolas e t-shirts alusivos ao Ubuntu e à Comunidade Ubuntu Portugal e estamos a vendê-las para angariar fundos para as atividades do grupo. Mas não acaba aqui! Também temos crachás para venda.

Eis uma amostra do material que temos:

Quiçá uma prenda de Natal? Ou simplesmente um acessório altamente estiloso?

O custo das t-shirts é de 10€, das hoodies é de 25€ e os crachás custam 1€.

Para encomendares, preenche o formulário que encontrás neste link: https://tos.typeform.com/to/FU6int

Contamos com o teu contributo!

Saudações cibernauticas

Sebastian Kügler: Different indentation styles per filetype

Pre, 23/11/2018 - 9:30pd

For my hacking, I love to use the KDevelop IDE. Once in a while, I find myself working on a project that has different indentation styles depending on the filetype — in this case, C++ files, Makefiles, etc. use tabs, JavaScript and HTML files use 2 spaces. I haven’t found this to be straight-forward from KDevelop’s configuration dialog (though I just learnt that it does seem to be possible). I did find myself having to fix indentation before committing (annoying!) and even having to fix up the indentation of code committed by myself (embarrassing!). As that’s both stupid and repetitive work, it’s something I wanted to avoid. Here’s how it’s done using EditorConfig files:

  1. put a file called .editorconfig in the project’s root directory
  2. specify a default style and then a specialization for certain filetypes
  3. restart KDevelop

Here’s what my .editorconfig file looks like:

# EditorConfig is awesome: https://EditorConfig.org # for the top-most EditorConfig file, set... # root = true # In general, tabs shown 2 spaces wide [*] indent_style = tab indent_size = 2 # Matches multiple files with brace expansion notation [*.{js,html}] indent_style = space indent_size = 2

This does the job nicely and has the following advantages:

  • It doesn’t affect my other projects, so I don’t have to run around in the configuration to switch when task-switching. (Editorconfigs cascade, so will be looked up up in the filesystem tree for fallback styles.
  • It works across different editors supporting the editorconfig standards, so not just KWrite, Kate, KDevelop, but also for entirely different products.
  • It allows me to spend less time on formalities and more time on actual coding (or diving).

(Thanks to Reddit.)

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E37 – Thirty Seven: Essays On Life, Wisdom, And Masculinity

Enj, 22/11/2018 - 4:00md

This week we’ve been building a new home server using SnapRAID and upgrading a Thinkpad to Ubuntu 16.04. Samsung debut the beta of Linux on DeX, Wireframe Magazine is out, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ is available, Ubuntu 18.04 will be supported for 10 years and we round up community news.

It’s Season 11 Episode 37 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

That’s all for this week! You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube. If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to show@ubuntupodcast.org or Tweet us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our Google+ page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

Colin King: High-level tracing with bpftrace

Enj, 22/11/2018 - 1:37md
Bpftrace is a new high-level tracing language for Linux using the extended Berkeley packet filter (eBPF).  It is a very powerful and flexible tracing front-end that enables systems to be analyzed much like DTrace.

The bpftrace tool is now installable as a snap. From the command line one can install it and enable it to use system tracing as follows:

sudo snap install bpftrace
sudo snap connect bpftrace:system-trace

To illustrate the power of bpftrace, here are some simple one-liners:

# trace openat() system calls
sudo bpftrace -e 'tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_openat { printf("%d %s %s\n", pid, comm, str(args->filename)); }'
Attaching 1 probe...
1080 irqbalance /proc/interrupts
1080 irqbalance /proc/stat
2255 dmesg /etc/ld.so.cache
2255 dmesg /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libtinfo.so.5
2255 dmesg /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/librt.so.1
2255 dmesg /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libc.so.6
2255 dmesg /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libpthread.so.0
2255 dmesg /usr/lib/locale/locale-archive
2255 dmesg /lib/terminfo/l/linux
2255 dmesg /home/king/.config/terminal-colors.d
2255 dmesg /etc/terminal-colors.d
2255 dmesg /dev/kmsg
2255 dmesg /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/gconv/gconv-modules.cache

# count system calls using tracepoints:
sudo bpftrace -e 'tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_* { @[probe] = count(); }'
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_getsockname]: 1
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_kill]: 1
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_prctl]: 1
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_epoll_wait]: 1
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_signalfd4]: 2
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_utimensat]: 2
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_set_robust_list]: 2
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_poll]: 2
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_socket]: 3
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_getrandom]: 3
@[tracepoint:syscalls:sys_enter_setsockopt]: 3
...

Note that it is recommended to use bpftrace with Linux 4.9 or higher.

The bpftrace github project page has an excellent README guide with some worked examples and is a very good place to start.  There is also a very useful reference guide and one-liner tutorial too.

If you have any useful btftrace one-liners, it would be great to share them. This is an amazingly powerful tool, and it would be interesting to see how it will be used.

Costales: Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day: Thanks Rudy (~cm-t)!

Mar, 20/11/2018 - 6:53md
Today is the Ubuntu Appreciation Day in which we share our thanks to people in our community for making Ubuntu great.

This year, I want to thank you to Rudy (~cm-t)! Why? Because IMHO he is an incredible activist, helpful, funny, always with a smile. He prints passion in everything related to Ubuntu. A perfect example for everyone!



Thanks Rudy |o/

Rhonda D'Vine: TDOR 2018

Mar, 20/11/2018 - 11:11pd

Today is Transgender Day Of Remembrance. Today is a black day for trans people around the globe. We mourn the trans folks that aren't amongst us anymore due to hate crime violence against them. Reach out to the trans folks that are part of your life, that you know, ask them if they are in need of emotional support on this day. There are more trans folks getting killed for being trans than there are days in a year. Furthermost black trans women of color. If you feel strong enough you can read about it in this article.

Also, we are facing huge threats for our mere existence all over the world these days. If you follow any social media, check the hashtag #WontBeErased. The US government follows a path of Erasing Gender left and right, which also affects intersex people likewise and manifests the gender binary and gender separation even further, also hurting cis people. Now also in Ontario, Canada, gender identity gets erased, too. And Brazil, where next year's DebConf will be held, which already has the highest trans murders in the world, has elected Bolsonaro, a right wing extremist who is outspokenly gay antagonist and misogynist. And then there is Tanzania which started a hunt for LGBTIQ people. And those reports are only the tip of the iceberg. I definitely missed some other countries shit, like Ukraine (where next year's European Lesbian* Conference is taking place) or Austrian's government being right-winged and cutting the social system left and right so we are in need of Wieder Donnerstag (a weekly Thursday demonstration) again.

I'm currently drafting the announce mail to send out about the creation of the Debian Diversity Team which we finally formed. It is more important than ever to make it clear and visible that discrimination has no place within Debian, and that we in fact are a diverse community. I can understand the wish that it should focus on the visibility and welcoming aspects of the team, and especially to not make it look like it's a reaction to those world events. Which it isn't, this is in the works since two years now. And I totally agree with that. I just have a hard time to not add a solidarity message alongside mentioning that we are aware of the crap that's going on in the world and that we see your pain, and share it. So yes, the team has finally formed, but the announcement mail through debian-devel-announce about it is still pending. And we are in contact with the local team for next year's DebConf and following the news about Brazil to figure out how to make it as safe as possible for attendees, so that fear shouldn't be the guiding factor for you to not attend.

Stay strong, sending you hugs if wanted.

/personal | permanent link | Comments: 2 |

Stephen Kelly: Composing AST Matchers in clang-tidy

Mar, 20/11/2018 - 10:16pd

When creating clang-tidy checks, it is common to extract parts of AST Matcher expressions to local variables. I expanded on this in a previous blog.

auto nonAwesomeFunction = functionDecl( unless(matchesName("^::awesome_")) ); Finder->addMatcher( nonAwesomeFunction.bind("addAwesomePrefix") , this); Finder->addMatcher( callExpr(callee(nonAwesomeFunction)).bind("addAwesomePrefix") , this);

Use of such variables establishes an emergent extension API for re-use in the checks, or in multiple checks you create which share matcher requirements.

When attempting to match items inside a ForStmt for example, we might encounter the difference in the AST depending on whether braces are used or not.

#include <vector> void foo() { std::vector<int> vec; int c = 0; for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i) vec.push_back(i); for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i) { vec.push_back(i); } }

In this case, we wish to match the push_back method inside a ForStmt body. The body item might be a CompoundStmt or the CallExpr we wish to match. We can match both cases with the anyOf matcher.

auto pushbackcall = callExpr(callee(functionDecl(hasName("push_back")))); Finder->addMatcher( forStmt( hasBody(anyOf( pushbackcall.bind("port_call"), compoundStmt(has(pushbackcall.bind("port_call"))) )) ) , this);

Having to list the pushbackcall twice in the matcher is suboptimal. We ca do better by defining a new API function which we can use in AST Matcher expressions:

auto hasIgnoringBraces = [](auto const& Matcher) { return anyOf( Matcher, compoundStmt(has(Matcher)) ); };

With this in hand, we can simplify the original expression:

auto pushbackcall = callExpr(callee(functionDecl(hasName("push_back")))); Finder->addMatcher( forStmt( hasBody(hasIgnoringBraces( pushbackcall.bind("port_call") )) ) , this);

This pattern of defining AST Matcher API using a lambda function finds use in other contexts. For example, sometimes we want to find and bind to an AST node if it is present, ignoring its absense if is not present.

For example, consider wishing to match struct declarations and match a copy constructor if present:

struct A { }; struct B { B(B const&); };

We can match the AST with the anyOf() and anything() matchers.

Finder->addMatcher( cxxRecordDecl(anyOf( hasMethod(cxxConstructorDecl(isCopyConstructor()).bind("port_method")), anything() )).bind("port_record") , this);

This can be generalized into an optional() matcher:

auto optional = [](auto const& Matcher) { return anyOf( Matcher, anything() ); };

The anything() matcher matches, well, anything. It can also match nothing because of the fact that a matcher written inside another matcher matches itself.

That is, matchers such as

functionDecl(decl()) functionDecl(namedDecl()) functionDecl(functionDecl())

match ‘trivially’.

If a functionDecl() in fact binds to a method, then the derived type can be used in the matcher:

functionDecl(cxxMethodDecl())

The optional matcher can be used as expected:

Finder->addMatcher( cxxRecordDecl( optional( hasMethod(cxxConstructorDecl(isCopyConstructor()).bind("port_method")) ) ).bind("port_record") , this);

Yet another problem writers of clang-tidy checks will find is that AST nodes CallExpr and CXXConstructExpr do not share a common base representing the ability to take expressions as arguments. This means that separate matchers are required for calls and constructions.

Again, we can solve this problem generically by creating a composition function:

auto callOrConstruct = [](auto const& Matcher) { return expr(anyOf( callExpr(Matcher), cxxConstructExpr(Matcher) )); };

which reads as ‘an Expression which is any of a call expression or a construct expression’.

It can be used in place of either in matcher expressions:

Finder->addMatcher( callOrConstruct( hasArgument(0, integerLiteral().bind("port_literal")) ) , this);

Creating composition functions like this is a very convenient way to simplify and create maintainable matchers in your clang-tidy checks. A recently published RFC on the topic of making clang-tidy checks easier to write proposes some other conveniences which can be implemented in this manner.

Stephen Michael Kellat: Hitting a Break Point

Mar, 20/11/2018 - 3:55pd

Well, I had a weekend off sick. The time has come to put things in motion. Health concerns pushed up my timetable for what was discussed prior.

I am seeking support to be able to undertake freelance work. The first project would be to finally close out the Outernet/Othernet research work to get it submitted. Beyond that there would be technical writing as well as making creative works. Some of that would involve creating “digital library” collections but also helping others create print works instead.

Who could I help/serve? Unfortunately we have plenty of small, underfunded groups in my town. The American Red Cross no longer maintains a local office and the Salvation Army has no staff presence locally. Our county-owned airport verges on financial collapse and multiple units of government have difficulty staying solvent. There are plenty of needs to cover as long as someone had independent financial backing.

Besides, I owe some edits of Xubuntu documentation too.

It isn’t like “going on disability” as it is called in American parlance is immediate let alone simple. One of two sets of paperwork has to eventually go into a cave in Pennsylvania for centralized processing. I wish I were kidding but that cave is located near Slippery Rock. Both processes are backlogged only 12-18 months at last report. For making a change in the short term, that doesn’t even exist as an option on the table.

That’s why I’m asking for support. I’ve grown tired of spending multiple days at work depressed. Showing physical symptoms of depression in the workplace isn’t good either especially when it results in me missing work. When you can’t help people who are in the throes of despair frequently by their own fault, how much more futile can it get?

I set the goal on Liberapay lower than what I get now. While it would be a pay cut, I’d still be able to pay the bills. It is time to move to doing something constructive for society instead of merely fueling the machinery of government. For as often as I get asked how I sleep at night, I want to move past the answer being “terribly”.

The relevant Liberapay page is here. Folks like Pepper & Carrot use it. If the goal can be initially met by December 7th, I would be ready for the potential budget snafu at work like the three we already had at the start of the year.

I just look forward to some day being able to talk about doing good things instead of having to be cryptic due to security restrictions.

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 554

Hën, 19/11/2018 - 11:18md

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 554 for the week of November 11 – 17, 2018. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

Tiago Carrondo: S01E11 – Alta Coltura

Hën, 19/11/2018 - 12:32pd

Esta semana o trio maravilha dedicou a sua atenção a sugestões de leitura, técnica ou não, porque a vida não são só podcasts… As novidades no mundo SolusOS, a parceria da Canonical e da Samsung e o projecto Linux on Dex, sem esquecer a Festa do Software Livre da Moita 2018, que está já aí! Já sabes: Ouve, subscreve e partilha!

Patrocínios

Este episódio foi produzido e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço (Thunderclaws Studios – captação, produção, edição, mistura e masterização de som) contacto: thunderclawstudiosPT–arroba–gmail.com.

Atribuição e licenças

A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos termos da CC0 1.0 Universal License.

Este episódio está licenciado nos termos da licença: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), cujo texto integral pode ser lido aqui. Estamos abertos a licenciar para permitir outros tipos de utilização, contactem-nos para validação e autorização.

Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #115

Dje, 18/11/2018 - 6:01md

Open Source Software: 20-Plus Years of Innovation
Source: https://www.linuxinsider.com/story/Open-Source-Software-20-Plus-Years-of-Innovation-85646.html

IBM Buys Linux & Open Source Software Distributor Red Hat For $34 Billion
Source: https://fossbytes.com/ibm-buys-red-hat-open-source-linux/

We (may) now know the real reason for that IBM takeover. A distraction for Red Hat to axe KDE
Source: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/11/02/rhel_deprecates_kde/

Ubuntu Founder Mark Shuttleworth Has No Plans Of Selling Canonical
Source: https://fossbytes.com/ubuntu-founder-mark-shuttleworth-has-no-plans-of-selling-canonical/

Mark Shuttleworth reveals Ubuntu 18.04 will get a 10-year support lifespan
Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/mark-shuttleworth-reveals-ubuntu-18-04-will-get-a-10-year-support-lifespan/

Debian GNU/Linux 9.6 “Stretch” Released with Hundreds of Updates
Source: https://news.softpedia.com/news/debian-gnu-linux-9-6-stretch-released-with-hundreds-of-updates-download-now-523739.shtml

Fresh Linux Mint 19.1 Arrives This Christmas
Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonevangelho/2018/11/01/fresh-linux-mint-19-1-arrives-this-christmas/#6c64618d293d

Linux-friendly company System76 shares more open source Thelio computer details
Source: https://betanews.com/2018/10/26/system76-open-source-thelio-linux/

Linus Torvalds Says Linux 5.0 Comes in 2019, Kicks Off Development of Linux 4.20
Source: https://news.softpedia.com/news/linus-torvalds-is-back-kicks-off-the-development-of-linux-kernel-4-20-523622.shtml

Canonical Adds Spectre V4, SpectreRSB Fixes to New Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Azure Kernel
Source: https://news.softpedia.com/news/canonical-adds-spectre-v4-spectrersb-fixes-to-new-ubuntu-18-04-lts-azure-kernel-523533.shtml

Trivial Bug in X.Org Gives Root Permission on Linux and BSD Systems
Source: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/trivial-bug-in-xorg-gives-root-permission-on-linux-and-bsd-systems/

Security Researcher Drops VirtualBox Guest-to-Host Escape Zero-Day on GitHub
Source: https://news.softpedia.com/news/security-researcher-drops-virtualbox-guest-to-host-escape-zero-day-on-github-523660.shtml

Robert Ancell: Counting Code in GNOME Settings

Enj, 15/11/2018 - 9:05md
I've been spending a bit of time recently working on GNOME Settings. One part of this has been bringing some of the older panel code up to modern standards, one of which is making use of GtkBuilder templates.
I wondered if any of these changes would show in the stats, so I wrote a program to analyse each branch in the git repository and break down the code between C and GtkBuilder. The results were graphed in Google Sheets:



This is just the user accounts panel, which shows some of the reduction in C code and increase in GtkBuilder data:


Here's the breakdown of which panels make up the codebase:



I don't think this draws any major conclusions, but is still interesting to see. Of note:
  • Some of the changes make in 3.28 did reduce the total amount of code! But it was quickly gobbled up by the new Thunderbolt panel.
  • Network and Printers are the dominant panels - look at all that code!
  • I ignored empty lines in the files in case differing coding styles would make some panels look bigger or smaller. It didn't seem to make a significant difference.
  • You can see a reduction in C code looking at individual panels that have been updated, but overall it gets lost in the total amount of code.
I'll have another look in a few cycles when more changes have landed (I'm working on a new sound panel at the moment).

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E36 – Thirty-Six Hours

Enj, 15/11/2018 - 4:00md

This week we’ve been resizing partitions. We interview Andrew Katz and discuss open souce and the law, bring you a command line love and go over all your feedback.

It’s Season 11 Episode 36 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

snap install hub hub ci-status hub issue hub pr hub sync hub pull-request
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!

  • Image credit: Greyson Joralemon

That’s all for this week! You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube. If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to show@ubuntupodcast.org or Tweet us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our Google+ page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2018

Enj, 15/11/2018 - 3:36md

Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In October, about 209 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

  • Abhijith PA did 1 hour (out of 10 hours allocated + 4 extra hours, thus keeping 13 extra hours for November).
  • Antoine Beaupré did 24 hours (out of 24 hours allocated).
  • Ben Hutchings did 19 hours (out of 15 hours allocated + 4 extra hours).
  • Chris Lamb did 18 hours (out of 18 hours allocated).
  • Emilio Pozuelo Monfort did 12 hours (out of 30 hours allocated + 29.25 extra hours, thus keeping 47.25 extra hours for November).
  • Holger Levsen did 1 hour (out of 8 hours allocated + 19.5 extra hours, but he gave back the remaining hours due to his new role, see below).
  • Hugo Lefeuvre did 10 hours (out of 10 hours allocated).
  • Markus Koschany did 30 hours (out of 30 hours allocated).
  • Mike Gabriel did 4 hours (out of 8 hours allocated, thus keeping 4 extra hours for November).
  • Ola Lundqvist did 4 hours (out of 8 hours allocated + 8 extra hours, but gave back 4 hours, thus keeping 8 extra hours for November).
  • Roberto C. Sanchez did 15.5 hours (out of 18 hours allocated, thus keeping 2.5 extra hours for November).
  • Santiago Ruano Rincón did 10 hours (out of 28 extra hours, thus keeping 18 extra hours for November).
  • Thorsten Alteholz did 30 hours (out of 30 hours allocated).
Evolution of the situation

In November we are welcoming Brian May and Lucas Kanashiro back as contributors after they took some break from this work.

Holger Levsen is stepping down as LTS contributor but is taking over the role of LTS coordinator that was solely under the responsibility of Raphaël Hertzog up to now. Raphaël continues to handle the administrative side, but Holger will coordinate the LTS contributors ensuring that the work is done and that it is well done.

The number of sponsored hours increased to 212 hours per month, we gained a new sponsor (that shall not be named since they don’t want to be publicly listed).

The security tracker currently lists 27 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 27 packages needing an update.

Thanks to our sponsors

New sponsors are in bold.

No comment | Liked this article? Click here. | My blog is Flattr-enabled.

Tiago Carrondo: S01E10 – Tendência livre

Mër, 14/11/2018 - 3:02pd

Desta vez com um convidado, o Luís Costa, falámos muito sobre hardware, hardware livre e como não poderia deixar de ser: dos novos produtos da Libretrend, as novíssimas Librebox. Em mês de eventos a agenda teve um especial destaque com as actualizações disponíveis de todos os encontros e eventos anunciados! Já sabes: Ouve, subscreve e partilha!

Patrocínios

Este episódio foi produzido e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço (Thunderclaws Studios – captação, produção, edição, mistura e masterização de som) contacto: thunderclawstudiosPT–arroba–gmail.com.

Atribuição e licenças

A imagem de capa: richard ling em Visualhunt e está licenciada como CC BY-NC-ND.

A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos termos da CC0 1.0 Universal License.

Este episódio está licenciado nos termos da licença: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), cujo texto integral pode ser lido aqui. Estamos abertos a licenciar para permitir outros tipos de utilização, contactem-nos para validação e autorização.

Stephen Kelly: Future Developments in clang-query

Dje, 11/11/2018 - 11:46md
Getting started – clang-tidy AST Matchers

Over the last few weeks I published some blogs on the Visual C++ blog about Clang AST Matchers. The series can be found here:

I am not aware of any similar series existing which covers creation of clang-tidy checks, and use of clang-query to inspect the Clang AST and assist in the construction of AST Matcher expressions. I hope the series is useful to anyone attempting to write clang-tidy checks. Several people have reported to me that they have previously tried and failed to create clang-tidy extensions, due to various issues, including lack of information tying it all together.

Other issues with clang-tidy include the fact that it relies on the “mental model” a compiler has of C++ source code, which might differ from the “mental model” of regular C++ developers. The compiler needs to have a very exact representation of the code, and needs to have a consistent design for the class hierarchy representing each standard-required feature. This leads to many classes and class hierarchies, and a difficulty in discovering what is relevant to a particular problem to be solved.

I noted several problems in those blog posts, namely:

  • clang-query does not show AST dumps and diagnostics at the same time<
  • Code completion does not work with clang-query on Windows
  • AST Matchers which are appropriate to use in contexts are difficult to discover
  • There is no tooling available to assist in discovery of source locations of AST nodes

Last week at code::dive in Wroclaw, I demonstrated tooling solutions to all of these problems. I look forward to video of that talk (and videos from the rest of the conference!) becoming available.

Meanwhile, I’ll publish some blog posts here showing the same new features in clang-query and clang-tidy.

clang-query in Compiler Explorer

Recent work by the Compiler Explorer maintainers adds the possibility to use source code tooling with the website. The compiler explorer contains new entries in a menu to enable a clang-tidy pane.

clang-tidy in Compiler Explorer

I demonstrated use of compiler explorer to use the clang-query tool at the code::dive conference, building upon the recent work by the compiler explorer developers. This feature will get upstream in time, but can be used with my own AWS instance for now. This is suitable for exploration of the effect that changing source code has on match results, and orthogonally, the effect that changing the AST Matcher has on the match results. It is also accessible via cqe.steveire.com.

It is important to remember that Compiler Explorer is running clang-query in script mode, so it can process multiple let and match calls for example. The new command set print-matcher true helps distinguish the output from the matcher which causes the output. The help command is also available with listing of the new features.

The issue of clang-query not printing both diagnostic information and AST information at the same time means that users of the tool need to alternate between writing

set output diag

and

set output dump

to access the different content. Recently, I committed a change to make it possible to enable both output and diag output from clang-query at the same time. New commands follow the same structure as the set output command:

enable output dump disable output dump

The set output <feature> command remains as an “exclusive” setting to enable only one output feature and disable all others.

Dumping possible AST Matchers

This command design also enables the possibility of extending the features which clang-query can output. Up to now, developers of clang-tidy extensions had to inspect the AST corresponding to their source code using clang-query and then use that understanding of the AST to create an AST Matcher expression.

That mapping to and from the AST “mental model” is not necessary. New features I am in the process of upstreaming to clang-query enable the output of AST Matchers which may be used with existing bound AST nodes. The command

enable output matcher

causes clang-query to print out all matcher expressions which can be combined with the bound node. This cuts out the requirement to dump the AST in such cases.

Inspecting the AST is still useful as a technique to discover possible AST Matchers and how they correspond to source code. For example if the functionDecl() matcher is already known and understood, it can be dumped to see that function calls are represented by the CallExpr in the Clang AST. Using the callExpr() AST Matcher and dumping possible matchers to use with it leads to the discovery that callee(functionDecl()) can be used to determine particulars of the function being called. Such discoveries are not possible by only reading AST output of clang-query.

Dumping possible Source Locations

The other important discovery space in creation of clang-tidy extensions is that of Source Locations and Source Ranges. Developers creating extensions must currently rely on the documentation of the Clang AST to discover available source locations which might be relevant. Usually though, developers have the opposite problem. They have source code, and they want to know how to access a source location from the AST node which corresponds semantically to that line and column in the source.

It is important to make use a semantically relevant source location in order to make reliable tools which refactor at scale and without human intervention. For example, a cursory inspection of the locations available from a FunctionDecl AST node might lead to the belief that the return type is available at the getBeginLoc() of the node.

However, this is immediately challenged by the C++11 trailing return type feature, where the actual return type is located at the end. For a semanticallly correct location, you must currently use

getTypeSourceInfo()->getTypeLoc().getAs().getReturnLoc().getBeginLoc()

It should be possible to use getReturnTypeSourceRange(), but a bug in clang prevents that as it does not appreciate the trailing return types feature.

Once again, my new output feature of clang-query presents a solution to this discovery problem. The command

enable output srcloc

causes clang-query to output the source locations by accessor and caret corresponding to the source code for each of the bound nodes. By inspecting that output, developers of clang-tidy extensions can discover the correct expression (usually via the clang::TypeLoc heirarchy) corresponding to the source code location they are interested in refactoring.

Next Steps

I have made many more modifications to clang-query which I am in the process of upstreaming. My Compiler explorer instance is listed as the ‘clang-query-future’ tool, while the clang-query-trunk tool runs the current trunk version of clang-query. Both can be enabled for side-by-side comparison of the future clang-query with the exising one.

Kubuntu General News: Plasma 5.14.3 update for Cosmic backports PPA

Mër, 07/11/2018 - 1:44md

We are pleased to announce that the 3rd bugfix release of Plasma 5.14, 5.14.3, is now available in our backports PPA for Cosmic 18.10.

The full changelog for 5.14.3 can be found here.

Already released in the PPA is an update to KDE Frameworks 5.51.

To upgrade:

Add the following repository to your software sources list:

ppa:kubuntu-ppa/backports

or if it is already added, the updates should become available via your preferred update method.

The PPA can be added manually in the Konsole terminal with the command:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kubuntu-ppa/backports

and packages then updated with

sudo apt update
sudo apt full-upgrade

 

IMPORTANT

Please note that more bugfix releases are scheduled by KDE for Plasma 5.14, so while we feel these backports will be beneficial to enthusiastic adopters, users wanting to use a Plasma release with more stabilisation/bugfixes ‘baked in’ may find it advisable to stay with Plasma 5.13.5 as included in the original 18.10 Cosmic release.

Should any issues occur, please provide feedback on our mailing list [1], IRC [2], and/or file a bug against our PPA packages [3].

1. Kubuntu-devel mailing list: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/kubuntu-devel
2. Kubuntu IRC channels: #kubuntu & #kubuntu-devel on irc.freenode.net
3. Kubuntu ppa bugs: https://bugs.launchpad.net/kubuntu-ppa

Diego Turcios: Access to AWS Postgres instance in private subnet

Mër, 07/11/2018 - 3:54pd
I have been working with AWS in the last days and encounter some issues when using RDS.  Generally when you're working in development environment you have setup your database as Publicly accessible and this isn't an issue. But when you're working in Production. So we place the Amazon RDS database into a private subnet. What we need to do for connecting to the database using PgAdmin or other tool?

We're going to use one of the most common methods for doing this. You will need to launch an Amazon EC2 instance in the public subnet and then use it as jumping box.

So after you have your EC2, you will need to run the following command.
See explantion below

After this, you will need to configure your PgAdmin.
The host name will be your localhost, the port is the same you define in the above command.
Maintenance database will be your DB name and the username you have for connecting.

Hope this helps you connect to your databases.

Jono Bacon: Video: 10 Avoidable Career Mistakes (and How to Conquer Them)

Mar, 06/11/2018 - 5:30md

I don’t claim to be a career expert, but I have noticed some important career mistakes many people make (some I’ve made myself!). These mistakes span how we approach our career growth, balance our careers with the rest of our lives, and the make the choices we do on a day to day basis.

In the latest episode of my Open Organization video series, I delve into 10 of the most important career mistakes people tend to make. Check it below:

So, now let me turn it to you. What are other career mistakes that are avoidable? What have you learned in your career? Share them in the comments below!

The post Video: 10 Avoidable Career Mistakes (and How to Conquer Them) appeared first on Jono Bacon.

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