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Microsoft's Nokia Plans Come Into Better Focus

Slashdot.org - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 11:51pd
Forbes has an update on what sort of future Nokia faces, as Microsoft reveals a strategy for making sense of the acquisition: [Microsoft EVP of devices Stephen] Elop laid out a framework for cost cuts in a memo to employees on July 17. Devices would focus on high and low cost Windows smartphones, suggesting a phasing out of feature phones and Android smartphones. Two business units, smart devices and mobile phones, would become one, thereby cutting overlap and overhead. Microsoft would reduce engineering in Beijing and San Diego and unwind engineering in Oulu, Finland. It would exit manufacturing in Komarom, Hungary; shift to lower cost areas like Manaus, Brazil and Reynosa, Mexico; and reduce manufacturing in Beijing and Dongguan, China. Also, CEO Stya Nadella gave hints about how Microsoft will make money on Nokia during Tuesday' conference call. Devices, he said, "go beyond" hardware and are about productivity. "I can take my Office Lens App, use the camera on the phone, take a picture of anything, and have it automatically OCR recognized and into OneNote in searchable fashion. There is a lot we can do with phones by broadly thinking about productivity." In other words, the sale of a smartphone is a means to other sales.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Rohan Garg: Plasma5 : Now more awesome as a Kubuntu ISO

Planet UBUNTU - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 11:39pd

The Kubuntu team is proud to announce the immediate availability of the Plasma 5 flavor of the Kubuntu ISO which can be found here. Unlike it’s Neon 5 counterpart , this ISO contains packages made from the stock Plasma 5.0 release . The ISO is meant to be a technical preview of what is to come when Kubuntu switches to Plasma 5 by default in a future release of Kubuntu.

A special note of thanks to the Plasma team for making a rocking release. If you enjoy using KDE as much as we do, please consider donating to Kubuntu and KDE :)

NB: When booting the live ISO up, at the login screen, just hit the login button and you’ll be logged into a Plasma 5 session.


Sagar Ghuge: GTG ! Past can not be changed

Planet GNOME - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 9:50pd

Hi everybody,

Sorry for the late update, was a little busy discussing about the implementation stuffs .

Anyways let me give you a brief  idea of what I have been able to implement and what’s changed so far .

Now we are following ” Past can not be changed ” rule for handling the edit event.

So What’s changed?

Initially we were storing all the recurring details with each instances, but storing all is useless once task gets overdue or completed as recurring details never gonna used .

So we have changed the little bit implementation stuffs like this :

If task gets overdue or completed then in that case we make the task as a normal task and next instance will be recurring . so eventually we are removing all recurring details when we are making it as a normal task except the rid attribute to keep track of instances which gets created.

How to handle the edit event ?

Following the rule “ Past can not be changed ” , we are providing the edit options ( edit current instance or all instances )  to only the task having the recurring pattern. There is a one “Hidden” task gets created when user open a task for editing, which is used to check that task is actually edited or not.

All instances : -

Doing a simple check that task is actually edited then only reflect the changes in the current instances and according to that future instances gets created .

Current instance only : -

Make the current instance as a normal task and make the Hidden task as active task.

With this, a majority of the work for my GSoC project is complete. Now I will be focusing on optimizing and tidy up my source code .


How Bird Flocks Resemble Liquid Helium

Slashdot.org - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 9:33pd
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "A flock of starlings flies as one, a spectacular display in which each bird flits about as if in a well-choreographed dance. Everyone seems to know exactly when and where to turn. Now, for the first time, researchers have measured how that knowledge moves through the flock—a behavior that mirrors certain quantum phenomena of liquid helium. Some of the more interesting findings: Tracking data showed that the message for a flock to turn started from a handful of birds and swept through the flock at a constant speed between 20 and 40 meters per second. That means that for a group of 400 birds, it takes just a little more than a half-second for the whole flock to turn."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Daniel Pocock: Secure that Dictaphone

Planet Debian - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 7:35pd

2014 has been a big year for dictaphones so far.

First, it was France and the secret recordings made by Patrick Buisson during the reign of President Sarkozy.

Then, a US court ordered the release of the confidential Boston College tapes, part of an oral history project. Originally, each participant had agreed their recording would only be released after their death. Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams was arrested and questioned over a period of 100 hours and released without charge.

Now Australia is taking its turn. In #dictagate down under, a senior political correspondent from a respected newspaper recorded (most likely with consent) some off-the-record comments of former conservative leader Ted Baillieu. Unfortunately, this journalist misplaced the dictaphone at the state conference of Baillieu's arch-rivals, the ALP. A scandal quickly errupted.

Secure recording technology

There is no question that electronic voice recordings can be helpful for people, including journalists, researchers, call centers and many other purposes. However, the ease with which they can now be distributed is only dawning on people.

Twenty years ago, you would need to get the assistance of a radio or TV producer to disseminate such recordings so widely. Today there is email and social media. The Baillieu tapes were emailed directly to 400 people in a matter of minutes.

Just as technology brings new problems, it also brings solutions. Encryption is one of them.

Is encryption worthwhile?

Coverage of the Snowden revelations has revealed that many popular security technologies are not one hundred percent safe. In each of these dictaphone cases, however, NSA-level expertise was not a factor. Even the most simplistic encryption would have caused endless frustration to the offenders who distributed the Baillieu tape.

How can anybody be sure encryption is reliable?

Part of the problem is education. Everybody using the technology needs to be aware of the basic concepts, for example, public key cryptography.

Another big question mark is back doors. There is ongoing criticism of Apple iPhone/iPod devices and the many ways that their encryption can be easily disabled by Apple engineers and presumably many former staff, security personnel and others. The message is clear: proprietary, closed-source solutions should be avoided. Free and open source technologies are the alternative. If a company does not give you the source code, how can anybody independently audit their code for security? With encryption software, what use is it if nobody has verified it?

What are the options?

However, given that the majority of people don't have a PhD in computer science or mathematics, are there convenient ways to get started with encryption?

Reading is a good start. The Code Book by Simon Singh (author of other popular science books like Fermat's Last Theorem) is very accessible, not classified and assumes no formal training in mathematics. Even for people who do know these topics inside out, it is a good book to share with friends and family.

The Guardian Project (no connection with Guardian Media of Edward Snowden fame) aims to provide a secure and easy to use selection of apps for pocket devices. This project has practical applications in business, journalism and politics alike.

How should a secure dictaphone app work?

Dictaphone users typically need to take their dictaphones in the field, so there is a risk of losing it or having it stolen. A strong security solution in this situation may involve creating an RSA key pair on a home/office computer, keeping the private key on the home computer and putting the public key on the dictaphone device. Configured this way, the dictaphone will not be able to play back any of the recordings itself - the user will always have to copy them to the computer for decryption.

Popular Android Apps Full of Bugs: Researchers Blame Recycling of Code

Slashdot.org - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 5:55pd
First time accepted submitter Brett W (3715683) writes "The security researchers that first published the 'Heartbleed' vulnerabilities in OpenSSL have spent the last few months auditing the Top 50 downloaded Android apps for vulnerabilities and have found issues with at least half of them. Many send user data to ad networks without consent, potentially without the publisher or even the app developer being aware of it. Quite a few also send private data across the network in plain text. The full study is due out later this week."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Benjamin Kerensa: Mozilla at O’Reilly Open Source Convention

Planet UBUNTU - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 3:48pd

Mozililla OSCON 2014 Team

This past week marked my fourth year of attending O’Reilly Open Source Convention (OSCON). It was also my second year speaking at the convention. One new thing that happened this year was I co-led Mozilla’s presence during the convention from our booth to the social events and our social media campaign.

Like each previous year, OSCON 2014 didn’t disappoint and it was great to have Mozilla back at the convention after not having a presence for some years. This year our presence was focused on promoting Firefox OS, Firefox Developer Tools and Firefox for Android.

While the metrics are not yet finished being tracked, I think our presence was a great success. We heard from a lot of developers who are already using our Developer tools and from a lot of developers who are not; many of which we were able to educate about new features and why they should use our tools.

Alex shows attendee Firefox Dev Tools

Attendees were very excited about Firefox OS with a majority of those stopping by asking about the different layers of the platform, where they can get a device, and how they can make an app for the platform.

In addition to our booth, we also had members of the team such as Emma Irwin who helped support OSCON’s Children’s Day by hosting a Mozilla Webmaker event which was very popular with the kids and their parents. It really was great to see the future generation tinkering with Open Web technologies.

Finally, we had a social event on Wednesday evening that was very popular so much that the Mozilla Portland office was packed till last call. During the social event, we had a local airbrush artist doing tattoos with several attendees opting for a Firefox Tattoo.

All in all, I think our presence last week was very positive and even the early numbers look positive. I want to give a big thanks to Stormy Peters, Christian Heilmann, Robyn Chau, Shezmeen Prasad, Dave Camp, Dietrich Ayala, Chris Maglione, William Reynolds, Emma Irwin, Majken Connor, Jim Blandy, Alex Lakatos for helping this event be a success.

William Yu: Progress in introspection for libical

Planet GNOME - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 3:20pd

A quick catchup, to add the support for introspection for libical, I create a description file for each structure and its APIs and then, use a generator program to automatically generate the introspectable library.

These two weeks, I continue to work on the generator and the rest of the description files. When I wrote the description files, I found that just like the source code, the description files themselves also include a lot of similar stuff which can be generated by some rules. So I decide to further cut the weight of the description files. If this project can be applied for some other non-introspectable libraries, the hard coding part will be minimized. 

In the next two weeks, the plan is:

1. Finish all the description files.

2. Set up the test environment and write tests for the generated codes.

3. Adjust the structure of this project so that the whole structure can be more clear and the parsing part can be put in one place so that it is easier to be debugged.

Have a wonderful and productive week!


Andrew Cowie: Vale Peter Miller

Planet GNOME - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 3:09pd

Sad to receive news this morning that a long time friend and colleague, Peter Miller, had passed.

“After fighting cancer for many years, finally lost”. No, not lost; if there was ever anyone who fought the battle of life and won it was be Peter. Even knowing he was at his last days he was unbowed. Visiting him last week he proudly showed us the woodworking plans and cut lists for some cabinets he was making for his wife MT. He had created the diagrams himself, writing C++ code to call manually drive a drawing library, outputting postscript. Let’s see you do architectural drawing without a CAD program. The date on the printout was two weeks ago.

“The world is a less interesting place today,” wrote another friend. No. Peter firmly believed that interest comes from within. The world is there to be explored, I can hear him saying. He taught us to go forth, wonder, and understand. And so we should.

AfC

Newly Discovered Virus Widespread in Human Gut

Slashdot.org - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 2:35pd
A newly discovered virus has been found by a San Diego State University team to live inside more than half of all sampled human gut cells sampled. Exploring genetic material found in intestinal samples, the international team uncovered the CrAssphage virus. They say the virus could influence the behaviour of some of the most common bacteria in our gut. Researchers say the virus has the genetic fingerprint of a bacteriophage - a type of virus known to infect bacteria. Phages may work to control the behaviour of bacteria they infect - some make it easier for bacteria to inhabit in their environments while others allow bacteria to become more potent. [Study lead Dr. Robert] Edwards said: "In some way phages are like wolves in the wild, surrounded by hares and deer. "They are critical components of our gut ecosystems, helping control the growth of bacterial populations and allowing a diversity of species." According to the team, CrAssphage infects one of the most common types of bacteria in our guts. National Geographic gives some idea why a virus so common in our gut should have evaded discovery for so long, but at least CrAssphage finally has a Wikipedia page of its own.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Duncan McGreggor: The Future of Programming - Themes at OSCON 2014

Planet UBUNTU - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 2:25pd
Series Links

A Qualitative OSCON Debrief

As you might have noticed from the OSCON Twitter-storm this year, the conference was a blast. Even if you weren't physically present, given the 17 tracks, you can imagine that the presentations -- and subsequent conversations -- were deeply varied.

This was the second OSCON I'd attended; the first was was in 2008 as a guest of Michael Bernstein, a friend who was speaking there. OSCON 2008 was a zoo - I'm not sure of the actual body count, but I've heard that attendees + vendors + miscellaneous topped 12,000 people over the course of the week (I would love to hear if someone has hard data on that -- googling didn't reveal much). OSCON 2008 was dominated by Big Data, Hadoop, and what seemed like endless posturing by all sorts. The most interesting bits of that conference were the outlines that formed around the conversations people weren't having. In fact, over the following 6 months, that's what I spent my spare time pondering: what people didn't say at OSCON.

This year's conference seemed like a completely different animal. It felt like easily 1/2 to 1/3rd the number of attendees in 2008. Where that had all the anonymizing feel of rush-hour in a major metropolitan hub, OSCON 2014 had a distinctly small-town vibe to it -- I was completely charmed. Conversations (overheard as well as participated in) were not littered with buzzwords, but rather focused on essence. The interactions were not continually distracted, but rather focused, allowing people to form, express, and dispute complete thoughts with their peers.


Conversations

So what were people talking about? Here are some of the topics I heard covered during lunches, in hallways, and at podiums; at pubs, in restaurants and at parks:
  • What communities are thriving?
  • Which [projects, organisations, companies, etc.] are treating their people right?
  • What successful processes are being followed at [project, organisation, etc.]?
  • Who is hiring and why should someone want to work there?
  • Where can I go to learn X? Who is teaching X? Who shares the most about X?
  • Which [projects, organisations] support X?
  • Why don't more [people, projects, organisations] care about [possible future X]?
  • Why don't more [people, projects, organisations] spend more time investigating the history of X for "lessons learned"?
  • There was so much more X in computing during the 60s and 70s -- what happened? [1]
  • Why are we reinventing X?
  • When is X going to be invented, and who's going to do it?
  • Everything is changing! I can't keep up anymore.
  • I want to keep up, but how?
  • Why can't we stop making so many X?
  • Nobody cares about Y anymore; we're all doing X now.
  • Full stack developers!
  • Haskell!
  • Fault-tolerant systems!

(It goes without saying that any one attendee couldn't possibly be exposed to enough conversations to form a perfectly accurate sense of the total distribution of conversation topics. No claim to the contrary is being made here :-))
After lots of reflection, here's how I classified most of the conversations I heard:
  • Developing communities,
  • Developing careers and/or personal/professional qualities, and
  • Developing software, 

along lines such as:
  • Effective maintenance, maturity, and health,
  • Focusing on the "art",  eventual mastery, and investments of time,
  • Tempering bare pragmatism with something resembling science or academic excellence,
  • Learning the new to bolster the old,
  • Inspiring innovation from a place of contemplation and analysis,
  • Mining the past for great ideas, and
  • Figuring out how to better share and spread the adoption of good ideas.


Themes

Generalized to such a degree, this could have been pretty much any congregation of interested, engaged minds since the dawn of civilization. So what does it look like if we don't normalize quite so much? Weighing these with what may well be my own bias (and the bias of like-minded peers), I submit to your review these themes:

  • A very strong interest in programming (thinking and creating) vs. integration (assessing and consuming).
  • An express desire to become better at abstraction (higher-order functions, composition, and types) to better deal with growing systems complexities.
  • An interest in building even more complicated systems.
  • A fear of reimplementing past mistakes or of letting dust gather on past intellectual achievements.

As you might have guessed, these number very highly among the reasons why the conference was such an unexpected pleasure for me. But it should also not come as a surprise that these themes are present:

  • We have had several years of companies such as Google and Amazon (AWS) building and deploying some of the most sophisticated examples of logic-made-manifest in human history. This has created perceived value in our industry and many wish to emulate it. Similarly, we have single purpose distributed systems being purchased for nearly 20 billion USD -- a different kind of complexity, with a different kind of perceived reward.
  • In the 70s and 80s, OOP adoption brought with it the ability to create large software systems in ways that people had not dared dream or were impractical to realize. Today's growing adoption of the Functional paradigm is giving early signs of allowing us to better integrate complex systems with more predictability and fewer errors.
  • Case studies of improvements in productivity or the capacity to handle highly complex or previously intractable problems with better abstractions, has ignited the passions of many. Not wanting to limit their scope of knowledge or sources of inspiration, people are not simply limiting themselves to the exploration of such things as Category Theory -- they are opening the vaults of computer science with such projects as Papers We Love.

There's a brave new world in the making. It's a world for programmers and thinkers, for philosophers and makers. There's a lot to learn, but it's really not so different from older worlds: the same passions drive us, the same idealism burns brightly. And it's nice to see that these themes arise not only in small, highly specialized venues such as university doctoral programs and StrangeLoop (or LambdaJam), but also in larger intersections of the industry like OSCON (or more general-audience ones like Meetups).

Up next: Adopting the Functional Paradigm?
PreviouslyAn Overview


Footnotes

[1] I strongly adhere to the multifaceted hypothesis proposed by Bret Victor here in the section titled "Why did all these ideas happen during this particular time period?"


Russ Allbery: AFS::PAG 1.02

Planet Debian - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 2:22pd

This is primarily a testing exercise. I moved my software release process and web page generation to a different host, and wanted to run through a release of a package to make sure that I got all the details right.

It's still a bit clunky, and I need to tweak the process, but it's close enough.

That said, there are a few minor changes in this module (which provides the minimum C glue required to do AFS operations from Perl — only the pieces that can't be duplicated by calling command-line programs). I'm improving the standardization of my Perl distributions, so I've moved NEWS to Changes and switched to the Lancaster Consensus environment variables for controlling testing. I also added some more pieces to the package metadata.

You can get the latest version from the AFS::PAG distribution page.

Off the Florida Coast, Astronauts Train For Asteroid Mission

Slashdot.org - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 1:06pd
Space.com gives an overview of the training that four astronauts are undergoing over 9 days submerged off the coast of Florida near Key Largo. The training mission, dubbed NEEMO 18, is one step toward a proposed (mid-2020s) mission to actually visit a captured asteroid in lunar orbit. In addition to the complications of working outside their school-bus sized habitat while awkwardly suited up in a low-gravity (or at least high buoyancy) environment, their mission also includes a 10-minute communications delay, to simulate the high-latency communications with mission control that would be inevitable for an actual asteroid mission. The experiments astronauts are doing during the mission, which began Monday (July 21), range from the physical to the behavioral. For example, each of the crew members sports a sensor that records how close the crew members work with each other inside the school-bus-size habitat. ... Communications with NEEMO Mission Control is usually constant, and there is the ability to send items to and from the habitat as needed. Also living inside the habitat are two support staff who are assisting with Aquarius maintenance and systems, as required. The crew members also have Internet and phone service to talk with family and friends.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Valencia Linux School Distro Saves 36 Million Euro

Slashdot.org - Hën, 28/07/2014 - 12:04pd
jrepin (667425) writes "The government of the autonomous region of Valencia (Spain) earlier this month made available the next version of Lliurex, a customisation of the Edubuntu Linux distribution. The distro is used on over 110,000 PCs in schools in the Valencia region, saving some 36 million euro over the past nine years, the government says." I'd lke to see more efforts like this in the U.S.; if mega school districts are paying for computers, I'd rather they at least support open source development as a consequence.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Router-Based Dev Board That Isn't a Router

Slashdot.org - Dje, 27/07/2014 - 11:10md
An anonymous reader writes with a link to an intriguing device highlighted at Hackaday (it's an Indiegogo project, too, if it excites you $90 worth, and seems well on its way to meeting its modest goal): The DPT Board is something that may be of interest to anyone looking to hack up a router for their own connected project or IoT implementation: hardware based on a fairly standard router, loaded up with OpenWRT, with a ton of I/O to connect to anything. It's called the DPT Board, and it's basically an hugely improved version of the off-the-shelf routers you can pick up through the usual channels. On board are 20 GPIOs, USB host, 16MB Flash, 64MB RAM, two Ethernet ports, on-board 802.11n and a USB host port. This small system on board is pre-installed with OpenWRT, making it relatively easy to connect this small router-like device to LED strips, sensors, or whatever other project you have in mind.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Michael Meeks: 2014-07-27: Sunday

Planet GNOME - Dje, 27/07/2014 - 11:00md
  • Opened up, hacked away - finally unwound my problems with the EditEngine - fields are filled in by an amazing series of app-specific callbacks hidden under Links. Nailed my bug. Helped Algot out with triage - managed to get the number of un-triaged bugs really rather low.
  • Dick and Jill arrived; Pizza for lunch. More work; Radek passed through, bid 'bye to Joel & Algot, kindly dropped home by Imanuel & Robinson, relaxed.
  • Family returned home, full of bounce & exhaustion after water-park-ing at some length. Lovely to see everyone again.

Satellite Images Show Russians Shelling Ukraine

Slashdot.org - Dje, 27/07/2014 - 10:05md
U.S. officials today made public satellite imagery which they say proves that Russian forces have been shelling eastern Ukraine in a campaign to assist rebel groups fighting Ukraine’s government. The U.S. Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which released the civilian-taken satellite images Sunday, said they show visual evidence that Russia has been firing shells across the border at Ukrainian military forces. Officials also said the images show that Russia-backed separatists have used heavy artillery, provided by Russia, in attacks on Ukrainian forces from inside Ukraine. One image dated July 25/26 shows what DNI claims is “ground scarring” on the Russian side of the border from artillery aimed at Ukrainian military units in Ukraine, as well as the resultant ground craters on the Ukrainian side of the border:

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

Slashdot.org - Dje, 27/07/2014 - 8:40md
hypnosec (2231454) writes to point out a pointed critique from Linus Torvalds of GCC 4.9.0. after a random panic was discovered in a load balance function in Linux 3.16-rc6. in an email to the Linux kernel mailing list outlining two separate but possibly related bugs, Linus describes the compiler as "terminally broken," and worse ("pure and utter sh*t," only with no asterisk). A slice: "Lookie here, your compiler does some absolutely insane things with the spilling, including spilling a *constant*. For chrissake, that compiler shouldn't have been allowed to graduate from kindergarten. We're talking "sloth that was dropped on the head as a baby" level retardation levels here .... Anyway, this is not a kernel bug. This is your compiler creating completely broken code. We may need to add a warning to make sure nobody compiles with gcc-4.9.0, and the Debian people should probably downgrate their shiny new compiler."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Duncan McGreggor: The Future of Programming - An Overview

Planet UBUNTU - Dje, 27/07/2014 - 8:02md
Art by Philip StraubThere's a new series of blog posts coming, inspired by on-going conversations with peers, continuous inspection of the development landscape, habitual navel-gazing, and participation at the catalytic OSCON 2014. As you might have inferred, these will be on the topic of "The Future of Programming."

Not to be confused with Bret Victor's excellent talk last year at DBX, these posts will be less about individual technologies or developer user experience, and more about historic trends and viewing the present (and near future) through such a lense.

In this mini-series, the aim is to present posts on following topics:
  • An Overview
  • Themes at OSCON 2014
  • Adopting The Functional Paradigm
  • Retrospective on Paradigms
  • The Rise of Polyglotism
  • Preparing for the Future
I did a similar set of posts, conceived in late 2008 and published in 2009 on the future of cloud computing entitled After the Cloud. In general, it was a very successful series and the cloud industry seems to be heading towards some of the predictions made in it -- ZeroVM and Docker are an incremental step towards the future of distributed processes/functions outlined in To Atomic Computation and Beyond
In that post, though, are two quotes from industry greats; these provide an excellent context for this series as well, hinting at an overriding theme:
  • Alan Kay, 1998: A crucial key to growing large systems is effective communications between components.
  • Joe Armstrong, 2004: To effectively model and solve problems in a distributed manner, we need concurrency... this is made easier when we isolate processes and do not share data.
In the decade since these statements were made, we have seen individuals, projects, and companies take that vision to heart -- and succeeding as a result. But as an industry, we continue to struggle with the definition of our art; we still are tormented by change -- both from within and externally -- and do not seem to adapt to it well.
These posts will peer into such places ... in the hope that such inspection might guide us better through the tangled forest of our present into the unimagined forest of our future.

SpaceX Executive Calls For $22-25 Billion NASA Budget

Slashdot.org - Dje, 27/07/2014 - 7:37md
MarkWhittington (1084047) writes "While participating in a panel called "The US Space Enterprise Partnership" at the NewSpace Conference that was held by the Space Frontier Foundation on Saturday, SpaceX Chief Operating Officer Gwynne Shotwell opined that NASA's budget should be raised to $22-25 billion, according to a tweet by Space Policy Online's Marcia Smith. The theory is that a lot of political rancor has taken place in the aerospace community because of the space agency's limited budget. If the budget were to be increased to pay for everything on the space wish list, the rancor will cease. The statement represents something of a departure of the usual mutual antagonism that exists between some in the commercial space community and some at NASA. Indeed Space Politics' Jeff Foust added a tweet, "Thought: a panel at a Space Frontier Foundation conf is talking about how to increase NASA budget. Imagine that in late 90s." The Space Frontier Foundation has been a leading voice for commercializing space, sometimes at the expense of NASA programs."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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