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Zeeshan Ali: GUADEC

Planet GNOME - 18 orë 14 min më parë
So its that time of the year! GUADEC is always loads of fun and meeting all those the awesome GNOME contributors in person and listening to their exciting stories and ideas gives me a renewed sense of motivation.

I have two regular talks this year:
  • Boxes: All packed & ready to go?
  • Geo-aware OS: Are we there yet?
Apart from that I also intend to present a lightning talk titled "Examples to follow". This talk will present stories of few of our awesome GNOME contributors and what we all can learn from them.


Mimicking Vesicle Fusion To Make Gold Nanoparticles Easily Penetrate Cells

Slashdot.org - 18 orë 20 min më parë
rtoz (2530056) writes A special class of tiny gold particles can easily slip through cell membranes, making them good candidates to deliver drugs directly to target cells. A new study from MIT materials scientists reveals that these nanoparticles enter cells by taking advantage of a route normally used in vesicle-vesicle fusion, a crucial process that allows signal transmission between neurons. MIT engineers created simulations of how a gold nanoparticle coated with special molecules can penetrate a membrane. Paper (abstract; full text paywalled).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Loophole Obscuring Facebook and Google's Transparency Reports

Slashdot.org - 19 orë 2 min më parë
Jason Koebler writes The number of law enforcement requests coming from Canada for information from companies like Facebook and Google are often inaccurate thanks to a little-known loophole that lumps them in with U.S. numbers. For example, law enforcement and government agencies in Canada made 366 requests for Facebook user data in 2013, according to the social network's transparency reports. But that's not the total number. An additional 16 requests are missing, counted instead with U.S. requests thanks to a law that lets Canadian agencies make requests with the U.S. Department of Justice.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








NASA Names Building For Neil Armstrong

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 11:38md
An anonymous reader writes A building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where Apollo astronauts once trained, was named in honor of astronaut Neil Armstrong. Armstrong, who died in 2012, was remembered at a ceremony as not only an astronaut, but also as an aerospace engineer, test pilot, and university professor. NASA renamed the Operations and Checkout building, also known as the O&C, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. It has been the last stop for astronauts before their flights since 1965. It was also used to test and process Apollo spacecraft. Currently, it's where the Orion spacecraft is being assembled to send astronauts to an asteroid and later to Mars.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The "Rickmote Controller" Can Hijack Any Google Chromecast

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 10:50md
redletterdave writes Dan Petro, a security analyst for the Bishop Fox IT consulting firm, built a proof of concept device that's able to hack into any Google Chromecasts nearby to project Rick Astley's "Never Gonna Give You Up," or any other video a prankster might choose. The "Rickmote," which is built on top of the $35 Raspberry Pi single board computer, finds a local Chromecast device, boots it off the network, and then takes over the screen with multimedia of one's choosing. But it gets worse for the victims: If the hacker leaves the range of the device, there's no way to regain control of the Chromecast. Unfortunately for Google, this is a rather serious issue with the Chromecast device that's not too easy to fix, as the configuration process is an essential part of the Chromecast experience.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Andrew Pollock: [debian] Day 173: Investigation for bug #749410 and fixing my VMs

Planet UBUNTU - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 10:25md

I have a couple of virt-manager virtual machines for doing DHCP-related work. I have one for the DHCP server and one for the DHCP client, and I have a private network between the two so I can simulate DHCP requests without messing up anything else. It works nicely.

I got a bit carried away, and I use LVM to snapshots for the work I do, so that when I'm done I can throw away the virtual machine's disks and work with a new snapshot next time I want to do something.

I have a cron job, that on a good day, fires up the virtual machines using the master logical volumes and does a dist-upgrade on a weekly basis. It seems to have varying degrees of success though.

So I fired up my VMs to do some investigation of the problem for #749410 and discovered that they weren't booting, because the initramfs couldn't find the root filesystem.

Upon investigation, the problem seemed to be that the logical volumes weren't getting activated. I didn't get to the bottom of why, but a manual activation of the logical volumes allowed the instances to continue booting successfully, and after doing manual dist-upgrades and kernel upgrades, they booted cleanly again. I'm not sure if I got hit by a passing bug in unstable, or what the problem was. I did burn about 2.5 hours just fixing everything up though.

Then I realised that there'd been more activity on the bug since I'd last read it while I was on vacation, and half the investigation I needed to do wasn't necessary any more. Lesson learned.

I haven't got to the bottom of the bug yet, but I had a fun day anyway.

Activist Group Sues US Border Agency Over New, Vast Intelligence System

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 10:03md
An anonymous reader writes with news about one of the latest unanswered FOIA requests made to the Department of Homeland Security and the associated lawsuit the department's silence has brought. The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) has sued the United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in an attempt to compel the government agency to hand over documents relating to a relatively new comprehensive intelligence database of people and cargo crossing the US border. EPIC's lawsuit, which was filed last Friday, seeks a trove of documents concerning the 'Analytical Framework for Intelligence' (AFI) as part of a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request. EPIC's April 2014 FOIA request went unanswered after the 20 days that the law requires, and the group waited an additional 49 days before filing suit. The AFI, which was formally announced in June 2012 by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), consists of "a single platform for research, analysis, and visualization of large amounts of data from disparate sources and maintaining the final analysis or products in a single, searchable location for later use as well as appropriate dissemination."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Jonathan Riddell: Barcelona, such a beautiful horizon

Planet UBUNTU - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 9:22md
KDE Project:

When life gives you a sunny beach to live on, make a mojito and go for a swim. Since KDE has an office that all KDE developer are welcome to use in Barcelona I decided to move to Barcelona until I get bored. So far there's an interesting language or two, hot weather to help my fragile head and water polo in the sky. Do drop by next time you're in town.


Plasma 5 Release Party Drinks

Also new poll for Plasma 5. What's your favourite feature?

How One School District Handled Rolling Out 20,000 iPads

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 9:15md
First time accepted submitter Gamoid writes This past school year, the Coachella Valley Unified School District gave out iPads to every single student. The good news is that kids love them, and only 6 of them got stolen or went missing. The bad news is, these iPads are sucking so much bandwidth that it's keeping neighboring school districts from getting online. Here's why the CVUSD is considering becoming its own ISP.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Researcher Finds Hidden Data-Dumping Services In iOS

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 8:28md
Trailrunner7 writes There are a number of undocumented and hidden features and services in Apple iOS that can be used to bypass the backup encryption on iOS devices and remove large amounts of users' personal data. Several of these features began as benign services but have evolved in recent years to become powerful tools for acquiring user data. Jonathan Zdziarski, a forensic scientist and researcher who has worked extensively with law enforcement and intelligence agencies, has spent quite a bit of time looking at the capabilities and services available in iOS for data acquisition and found that some of the services have no real reason to be on these devices and that several have the ability to bypass the iOS backup encryption. One of the services in iOS, called mobile file_relay, can be accessed remotely or through a USB connection can be used to bypass the backup encryption. If the device has not been rebooted since the last time the user entered the PIN, all of the data encrypted via data protection can be accessed, whether by an attacker or law enforcement, Zdziarski said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ian Campbell: sunxi-tools now available in Debian

Planet Debian - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 8:10md

I've recently packaged the sunxi tools for Debian. These are a set of tools produce by the Linux Sunxi project for working with the Allwinner "sunxi" family of processors. See the package page for details. Thanks to Steve McIntyre for sponsoring the initial upload.

The most interesting component of the package are the tools for working with the Allwinner processors' FEL mode. This is a low-level processor mode which implements a simple USB protocol allowing for initial programming of the device and recovery which can be entered on boot (usually be pressing a special 'FEL button' somewhere on the device). It is thanks to FEL mode that most sunxi based devices are pretty much unbrickable.

The most common use of FEL is to boot over USB. In the Debian package the fel and usb-boot tools are named sunxi-fel and sunxi-usb-boot respectively but otherwise can be used in the normal way described on the sunxi wiki pages.

One enhancement I made to the Debian version of usb-boot is to integrate with the u-boot packages to allow you to easily FEL boot any sunxi platform supported by the Debian packaged version of u-boot (currently only Cubietruck, more to come I hope). To make this work we take advantage of Multiarch to install the armhf version of u-boot (unless your host is already armhf of course, in which case just install the u-boot package):

# dpkg --add-architecture armhf # apt-get update # apt-get install u-boot:armhf Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done The following NEW packages will be installed: u-boot:armhf 0 upgraded, 1 newly installed, 0 to remove and 1960 not upgraded. Need to get 0 B/546 kB of archives. After this operation, 8,676 kB of additional disk space will be used. Retrieving bug reports... Done Parsing Found/Fixed information... Done Selecting previously unselected package u-boot:armhf. (Reading database ... 309234 files and directories currently installed.) Preparing to unpack .../u-boot_2014.04+dfsg1-1_armhf.deb ... Unpacking u-boot:armhf (2014.04+dfsg1-1) ... Setting up u-boot:armhf (2014.04+dfsg1-1) ...

With that done FEL booting a cubietruck is as simple as starting the board in FEL mode (by holding down the FEL button when powering on) and then:

# sunxi-usb-boot Cubietruck - fel write 0x2000 /usr/lib/u-boot/Cubietruck_FEL/u-boot-spl.bin fel exe 0x2000 fel write 0x4a000000 /usr/lib/u-boot/Cubietruck_FEL/u-boot.bin fel write 0x41000000 /usr/share/sunxi-tools//ramboot.scr fel exe 0x4a000000

Which should result in something like this on the Cubietruck's serial console:

U-Boot SPL 2014.04 (Jun 16 2014 - 05:31:24) DRAM: 2048 MiB U-Boot 2014.04 (Jun 16 2014 - 05:30:47) Allwinner Technology CPU: Allwinner A20 (SUN7I) DRAM: 2 GiB MMC: SUNXI SD/MMC: 0 In: serial Out: serial Err: serial SCSI: SUNXI SCSI INIT Target spinup took 0 ms. AHCI 0001.0100 32 slots 1 ports 3 Gbps 0x1 impl SATA mode flags: ncq stag pm led clo only pmp pio slum part ccc apst Net: dwmac.1c50000 Hit any key to stop autoboot: 0 sun7i#

As more platforms become supported by the u-boot packages you should be able to find them in /usr/lib/u-boot/*_FEL.

There is one minor inconvenience which is the need to run sunxi-usb-boot as root in order to access the FEL USB device. This is easily resolved by creating /etc/udev/rules.d/sunxi-fel.rules containing either:

SUBSYSTEMS=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="1f3a", ATTR{idProduct}=="efe8", OWNER="myuser"

or

SUBSYSTEMS=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="1f3a", ATTR{idProduct}=="efe8", GROUP="mygroup"

To enable access for myuser or mygroup respectively. Once you have created the rules file then to enable:

# udevadm control --reload-rules

As well as the FEL mode tools the packages also contain a FEX (de)compiler. FEX is Allwinner's own hardware description language and is used with their Android SDK kernels and the fork of that kernel maintained by the linux-sunxi project. Debian's kernels follow mainline and therefore use Device Tree.

UEA Research Shows Oceans Vital For Possibility of Alien Life

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 7:40md
An anonymous reader writes New research at the University of East Anglia finds that oceans are vital in the search for alien life. So far, computer simulations of habitable climates on other planets have focused on their atmospheres. But oceans play an equally vital role in moderating climates on planets and bringing stability to the climate, according to the study. From the press release: "The research team from UEA's schools of Mathematics and Environmental Sciences created a computer simulated pattern of ocean circulation on a hypothetical ocean-covered Earth-like planet. They looked at how different planetary rotation rates would impact heat transport with the presence of oceans taken into account. Prof David Stevens from UEA's school of Mathematics said: 'The number of planets being discovered outside our solar system is rapidly increasing. This research will help answer whether or not these planets could sustain alien life. We know that many planets are completely uninhabitable because they are either too close or too far from their sun. A planet's habitable zone is based on its distance from the sun and temperatures at which it is possible for the planet to have liquid water. But until now, most habitability models have neglected the impact of oceans on climate.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Daniel Pocock: Australia can't criticize Putin while competing with him

Planet Debian - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 7:00md

While much of the world is watching the tragedy of MH17 and contemplating the grim fate of 298 deceased passengers sealed into a refrigerated freight train in the middle of a war zone, Australia (with 28 victims on that train) has more than just theoretical skeletons in the closet too.

At this moment, some 153 Tamil refugees, fleeing the same type of instability that brought a horrible death to the passengers of MH17, have been locked up in the hull of a customs ship on the high seas. Windowless cabins and a supply of food not fit for a dog are part of the Government's strategy to brutalize these people for simply trying to avoid the risk of enhanced imprisonment(TM) in their own country.

Under international protocol for rescue at sea and political asylum, these people should be taken to the nearest port and given a humanitarian visa on arrival. Australia, however, is trying to lie and cheat their way out of these international obligations while squealing like a stuck pig about the plight of Australians in the hands of Putin. If Prime Minister Tony Abbott wants to encourage Putin to co-operate with the international community, shouldn't he try to lead by example? How can Australians be safe abroad if our country systematically abuses foreigners in their time of need?

Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 6:53md
An anonymous reader writes Verizon is boosting the upload speeds of nearly all its FiOS connections to match the download speeds, greatly shortening the time it takes to send videos and back up files online. All new subscribers will get "symmetrical" connections. If you previously were getting 15 Mbps down and 5 Mbps up, you'll be automatically upgraded for no extra cost to 15/15. Same goes if you were on their 50/25 plan: You'll now be upgraded to 50/50. And if you had 75/35? You guessed it: Now it'll be 75 down, and 75 up.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Elizabeth K. Joseph: The Official Ubuntu Book, 8th Edition now available!

Planet UBUNTU - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 6:21md

This past spring I had the great opportunity to work with Matthew Helmke, José Antonio Rey and Debra Williams of Pearson on the 8th edition of The Official Ubuntu Book.

In addition to the obvious task of updating content, one of our most important tasks was working to “future proof” the book more by doing rewrites in a way that would make sure the content of the book was going to be useful until the next Long Term Support release, in 2016. This meant a fair amount of content refactoring, less specifics when it came to members of teams and lots of goodies for folks looking to become power users of Unity.

Quoting the product page from Pearson:

The Official Ubuntu Book, Eighth Edition, has been extensively updated with a single goal: to make running today’s Ubuntu even more pleasant and productive for you. It’s the ideal one-stop knowledge source for Ubuntu novices, those upgrading from older versions or other Linux distributions, and anyone moving toward power-user status.

Its expert authors focus on what you need to know most about installation, applications, media, administration, software applications, and much more. You’ll discover powerful Unity desktop improvements that make Ubuntu even friendlier and more convenient. You’ll also connect with the amazing Ubuntu community and the incredible resources it offers you.

Huge thanks to all my collaborators on this project. It was a lot of fun to work them and I already have plans to work with all three of them on other projects in the future.

So go pick up a copy! As my first published book, I’d be thrilled to sign it for you if you bring it to an event I’m at, upcoming events include:

And of course, monthly Ubuntu Hours and Debian Dinners in San Francisco.

Method Rapidly Reconstructs Animal's Development Cell By Cell

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 6:05md
An anonymous reader writes Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus have developed software that can track each and every cell in a developing embryo. The software will allow a researcher to pick out a single cell at any point in development and trace its life backward and forward during the embryo's growth. Philipp Keller, a group leader at Janelia says: "We want to reconstruct the elemental building plan of animals, tracking each cell from very early development until late stages, so that we know everything that has happened in terms of cell movement and cell division. In particular, we want to understand how the nervous system forms. Ultimately, we would like to collect the developmental history of every cell in the nervous system and link that information to the cell's final function. For this purpose, we need to be able to follow individual cells on a fairly large scale and over a long period of time."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Why My LG Optimus Cellphone Is Worse Than It's Supposed To Be

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 5:17md
Bennett Haselton writes My LG Optimus F3Q was the lowest-end phone in the T-Mobile store, but a cheap phone is supposed to suck in specific ways that make you want to upgrade to a better model. This one is plagued with software bugs that have nothing to do with the cheap hardware, and thus lower one's confidence in the whole product line. Similar to the suckiness of the Stratosphere and Stratosphere 2 that I was subjected to before this one, the phone's shortcomings actually raise more interesting questions — about why the free-market system rewards companies for pulling off miracles at the hardware level, but not for fixing software bugs that should be easy to catch. Read below to see what Bennett has to say.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Steve Kemp: An alternative to devilspie/devilspie2

Planet Debian - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 4:30md

Recently I was updating my dotfiles, because I wanted to ensure that media-players were "always on top", when launched, as this suits the way I work.

For many years I've used devilspie to script the placement of new windows, and once I googled a recipe I managed to achieve my aim.

However during the course of my googling I discovered that devilspie is unmaintained, and has been replaced by something using Lua - something I like.

I'm surprised I hadn't realized that the project was dead, although I've always hated the configuration syntax it is something that I've used on a constant basis since I found it.

Unfortunately the replacement, despite using Lua, and despite being functional just didn't seem to gell with me. So I figured "How hard could it be?".

In the past I've written softare which iterated over all (visible) windows, and obviously I'm no stranger to writing Lua bindings.

However I did run into a snag. My initial implementation did two things:

  • Find all windows.
  • For each window invoke a lua script-file.

This worked. This worked well. This worked too well.

The problem I ran into was that if I wrote something like "Move window 'emacs' to desktop 2" that action would be applied, over and over again. So if I launched emacs, and then manually moved the window to desktop3 it would jump back!

In short I needed to add a "stop()" function, which would cause further actions against a given window to cease. (By keeping a linked list of windows-to-ignore, and avoiding processing them.)

The code did work, but it felt wrong to have an ever-growing linked-list of processed windows. So I figured I'd look at the alternative - the original devilspie used libwnck to operate. That library allows you to nominate a callback to be executed every time a new window is created.

If you apply your magic only on a window-create event - well you don't need to bother caching prior-windows.

So in conclusion :

I think my code is better than devilspie2 because it is smaller, simpler, and does things more neatly - for example instead of a function to get geometry and another to set it, I use one. (e.g. "xy()" returns the position of a window, but xy(3,3) sets it.).

kpie also allows you to run as a one-off job, and using the simple primitives I wrote a file to dump your windows, and their size/placement, which looks like this:

shelob ~/git/kpie $ ./kpie --single ./samples/dump.lua -- Screen width : 1920 -- Screen height: 1080 .. if ( ( window_title() == "Buddy List" ) and ( window_class() == "Pidgin" ) and ( window_application() == "Pidgin" ) ) then xy(1536,24 ) size(384,1032 ) workspace(2) end if ( ( window_title() == "feeds" ) and ( window_class() == "Pidgin" ) and ( window_application() == "Pidgin" ) ) then xy(1,24 ) size(1536,1032 ) workspace(2) end ..

As you can see that has dumped all my windows, along with their current state. This allows a simple starting-point - Configure your windows the way you want them, then dump them to a script file. Re-run that script file and your windows will be set back the way they were! (Obviously there might be tweaks required.)

I used that starting-point to define a simple recipe for configuring pidgin, which is more flexible than what I ever had with pidgin, and suits my tastes.

Bug-reports welcome.

China Has More People Going Online With a Mobile Device Than a PC

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 4:30md
An anonymous reader points out that even though China's internet adoption rate is the lowest it's been in 8 years, the number of people surfing the net from a mobile device has never been higher. "The number of China's internet users going online with a mobile device — such as a smartphone or tablet — has overtaken those doing so with a personal computer (PC) for the first time, said the official China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) on Monday. China's total number of internet users crept up 2.3 percent to 632 million by the end of June, from 618 million at the end of 2013, said CNNIC's internet development statistics report. Of those, 527 million — or 83 percent — went online via mobile. Those doing so with a PC made up 81 percent the total. China is the largest smartphone market in the world, and by 2018 is likely to account for nearly one-third of the expected 1.8 billion smartphones shipped that year, according to data firm IDC.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








New Toyota Helps You Yell At the Kids

Slashdot.org - Hën, 21/07/2014 - 3:43md
An anonymous reader writes If you're tired of yelling at the kids without the help of technology, Toyota has a van for you. From the article: "The latest version of the company's Sienna minivan has a feature called 'Driver Easy Speak.' It uses a built-in microphone to amplify a parent's voice through speakers in the back seats. Toyota says it added Easy Speak 'so parents don't have to shout to passengers in the back.' But chances are many parents will yell into the microphone anyway. And the feature only works one way, so the kids can't talk back. At least not with amplified voices. The feature is an option on the 2015 Sienna, which is being refreshed with a totally new interior. It also has an optional 'pull-down conversation mirror' that lets drivers check on kids without turning around."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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