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Daniel G. Siegel: summing up 79

Planet GNOME - Hën, 26/09/2016 - 5:52md

i am trying to build a jigsaw puzzle which has no lid and is missing half of the pieces. i am unable to show you what it will be, but i can show you some of the pieces and why they matter to me. if you are building a different puzzle, it is possible that these pieces won't mean much to you, maybe they won't fit or they won't fit yet. then again, these might just be the pieces you're looking for. this is summing up, please find previous editions here.

No to NoUI, by Timo Arnall

We must abandon invisibility as a goal for interfaces; it’s misleading, unhelpful and ultimately dishonest. It unleashes so much potential for unusable, harmful and frustrating interfaces, and systems that gradually erode users and designers agency. Invisibility might seem an attractive concept at first glance, but it ignores the real, thorny, difficult issues of designing and using complex interfaces and systems.

when was the last time you visited a website, used an app or a device and just couldn't find a way to do what you wanted? it seems to me that we're always optimizing for design, but seldom for the actual user. a user interface is about machines helping us, instead of us adapting to machines.

How to Use a MAGAZINE, by Khoi Vinh

a tongue-in-cheek parody of the concept of instructional screens of apps. it's funny as we don't need instructions to use a magazine. but it also shows how complex they are if we see them as interfaces, as there's a lot of learned conventions going on here. everything is learned however, and we constantly have to make assumptions on what our audience knows and has already learnt.

In Search of Tomorrow, by Chris Granger

The craziest realization for me has been that if we took a step back and stop thinking about programming for a moment, we managed to come up with a thing that doesn't look like programming anymore. It's just asking questions and formatting results. And that encompasses all of the things we wanna do. That is an amazing result to me.

I'm not saying we've done it and I have no idea what programming is gonna look like in 10 years. But my hope is that whatever programming does look like, that it looks nothing like the programming we have now. The last thing I want is you guys who are trying to cure cancer or trying to understand the cosmos or whatever you're doing have to worry about these ridiculous things that have nothing to do with the amazing stuff you're trying to do. I don't want to look like that at all.

Because at the end of the day, the real goal here is a thinking tool and that is what we have to get back to.

a talk on the progress of experiments to make programming easier and more accessible. after all, we don't need to program our computers, we need a way to solve our problems and augment our capabilities. programming is not a tool for building apps or websites, it is a tool to think with. and the more accessible it becomes, the better for humanity.

Karen Sandler: ContractPatch, Step 2: Understanding the power balance

Planet GNOME - Hën, 26/09/2016 - 5:08md

Employment agreements are one of the things that I’m asked the most regularly about in the free and open source software world, almost rivaling questions about licenses. My responses have always been the usual lawyerly responses of This Is Not Legal Advice and while I Am A Lawyer, I Am Not Your Lawyer (I’m generally not acting as a lawyer on behalf of Conservancy as its Executive Director either). But even from my early days of being involved with free software, I have seen that there’s a lack of understanding about employment agreements and the ability of employees to get their agreements modified. Last month, Fred announced a new initiative that we are working on together, called ContractPatch. With ContractPatch, our goal is to help provide knowledge to employees, along with sample language for better contract terms. The first step in this process is understanding the dynamics at work in employment arrangements. Step 1 is knowing that everything is negotiable and step 2 is knowing where you stand in the negotiation. Quite simply, you likely will never have as much power as you do the moment just before you sign your employment agreement.

At the point you are presented with a job offer, your prospective employer really wants to hire you. Chances are, they’ve screened and interviewed a number of candidates and put a lot of work into the process. Your manager has thought deeply about who they want in the position and has probably imagined how it will all work out with you in the role. Both you and the hiring decision-maker(s) are probably very optimistic about what you’ll accomplish in the role and how well you’ll get along working together. At this point, no one wants to go back to the drawing board and start the process over again. You will be excited to start the new job but it’s worth taking a step back to appreciate the unusual position you are in with your new employer.

As part of the hiring process, you’ll be expected to negotiate your salary (this can be complicated) and finalize all of the terms of your employment. Terms of employment can also be looked at through the lens of compensation, and asking for more favorable terms in your employment contract can be another kind of perk an employer can give you if they have a tight budget. A classic contract negotiation tactic (I even learned this in law school) is to make an agreement stronger in the first draft than you really need it to be, just so that you can give something away when pushed. This is certainly true of many company’s standard agreement templates. The only way to find out is to ask.

Once you take the job, it’s harder to change your terms of employment (though it’s possible, as we’ll cover later). Think hard about the long term impact of signing the agreement and whether things could happen down the road that would make you feel less comfortable with working under those terms. We’ll be giving you some examples of situations you want to be prepared for when we talk about specific contract provisions.

Asking for more favorable terms doesn’t have to be an adversarial process. You can ask for an agreement to be amended in a friendly way. Employers often respect workers more when they advocate for themselves.

So, we’ll help you think about how to engage with your employer while anticipating things that could go wrong down the road and how to ask for more favorable terms. You can sign up for our mailing list to be part of the conversation. While it may be easier to avoid negotiating your agreement, don’t trade short term comfort for your long term benefit.

Luis Villa: Public licenses and data: So what to do instead?

Planet GNOME - Hën, 26/09/2016 - 5:05md

I just explained why open and copyleft licensing, which work fairly well in the software context, might not be legally workable, or practically a good idea, around data. So what to do instead? tl;dr: say no to licenses, say yes to norms.

Day 43-Sharing” by A. David Holloway, under CC BY 2.0.

Partial solutions

In this complex landscape, it should be no surprise that there are no perfect solutions. I’ll start with two behaviors that can help.

Education and lawyering: just say no

If you’re reading this post, odds are that, within your organization or community, you’re known as a data geek and might get pulled in when someone asks for a new data (or hardware, or culture) license. The best thing you can do is help explain why restrictive “public” licensing for data is a bad idea. To the extent there is a community of lawyers around open licensing, we also need to be comfortable saying “this is a bad idea”.

These blog posts, to some extent, are my mea culpa for not saying “no” during the drafting of ODbL. At that time, I thought that if only we worked hard enough, and were creative enough, we could make a data license that avoided the pitfalls others had identified. It was only years later that I finally realized there were systemic reasons why we were doomed, despite lots of hard work and thoughtful lawyering. These posts lay out why, so that in the future I can say no more efficiently. Feel free to borrow them when you also need to say no :)

Project structure: collaboration builds on itself

When thinking about what people actually want from open licenses, it is important to remember that how people collaborate is deeply impacted by factors of how your project is structured. (To put it another way, architecture is also law.) For example, many kernel contributors feel that the best reason to contribute your code to the Linux kernel is not because of the license, but because the high velocity of development means that your costs are much lower if you get your features upstream quickly. Similarly, if you can build a big community like Wikimedia’s around your data, the velocity of improvements is likely to reduce the desire to fork. Where possible, consider also offering services and collaboration spaces that encourage people to work in public, rather than providing the bare minimum necessary for your own use. Or more simply, spend money on community people, rather than lawyers! These kinds of tweaks can often have much more of an impact on free-riding and contribution than any license choice. Unfortunately, the details are often project specific – which makes it hard to talk about in a blog post! Especially one that is already too long.

Solving with norms

So if lawyers should advise against the use of data law, and structuring your project for collaboration might not apply to you, what then? Following Peter Desmet, Science Commons, and others, I think the right tool for building resilient, global communities of sharing (in data and elsewhere) is written norms, combined with a formal release of rights.

Norms are essentially optimistic statements of what should be done, rather than formal requirements of what must be done (with the enforcement power of the state behind them). There is an extensive literature, pioneered by Nobelist Elinor Ostrom, on how they are actually how a huge amount of humankind’s work gets done – despite the skepticism of economists and lawyers. Critically, they often work even without the enforcement power of the legal system. For example, academia’s anti-plagiarism norms (when buttressed by appropriate non-legal institutional supports) are fairly successful. While there are still plagiarism problems, they’re fairly comparable to the Linux kernel’s GPL-violation problems – even though, unlike GPL, there is no legal enforcement mechanisms!

Norms and licenses have similar benefits

In many key ways, norms are not actually significantly different than licenses. Norms and licenses both can help (or hurt) a community reach their goals by:

  • Educating newcomers about community expectations: Collaboration requires shared understanding of the behavior that will guide that collaboration. Written norms can create that shared expectation just as well as licenses, and often better, since they can be flexible and human-readable in ways legally-binding international documents can’t.
  • Serving as the basis for social pressure: For the vast majority of collaborative projects, praise, shame, and other social nudges, not legal threats, are the actual basis for collaboration. (If you need proof of this, consider the decades-long success of open source before any legal enforcement was attempted.) Again, norms can serve this role just as well or not better, since it is often desire to cooperate and a fear of shaming that are what actually drive collaboration.
  • Similar levels of enforcement: While you can’t use the legal system to enforce a norm, most people and organizations also don’t have the option to use the legal system to enforce licenses – it is too expensive, or too time consuming, or the violator is in another country, or one of many other reasons why the legal system might not be an option (especially in data!) So instead most projects result to tools like personal appeals or threats of publicity – tools that are still available with norms.
  • Working in practice (usually): As I mentioned above, basing collaboration on social norms, rather than legal tools, work all the time in real life. The idea that collaboration can’t occur without the threat of legal sanction is really a somewhat recent invention. (I could actually have listed this under differences – since, as Ostrom teaches us, legal mechanisms often fail where norms succeed, and I think that is the case in data too.)
Why are norms better?

Of course, if norms were merely “as good as” licenses in the ways I just listed, I probably wouldn’t recommend them. Here are some ways that they can be better, in ways that address some of the concerns I raised in my earlier posts in this series:

  • Global: While [building global norms is not easy](http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3038591/), social norms based on appeals to the very human desires for collaboration and partnership can be a lot more global than the current schemes for protecting database or hardware rights, which aren’t international. (You can try to fake internationalization through a license, but as I pointed out in earlier posts, that is likely to fail legally, and be ignored by exactly the largest partners who you most want to get on board.)
  • Flexible: Many of the practical problems with licenses in data space boil down to their inflexibility: if a license presumes something to be true, and it isn’t, you might not be able to do anything about it. Norms can be much more generous – well-intentioned re-users can creatively reinterpret the rules as necessary to get to a good outcome, without having to ask every contributor to change the license. (Copyright law in the US provides some flexibility through fair use, which has been critical in the development of the internet. The EU does not extend such flexibility to data, though member states can add some fair dealing provisions if they choose. In neither case are those exceptions global, so they can’t be relied on by collaborative projects that aim to be global in scope.)
  • Work against, not with, the permission culture: Lessig warned us early on about “permission culture” – the notion that we would always need to ask permission to do anything. Creative Commons was an attempt to fight it, but by being a legal obligation, rather than a normative statement, it made a key concession to the permission culture – that the legal system was the right terrain to have discussions about sharing. The digital world has pretty whole-heartedly rejected this conclusion, sharing freely and constantly. As a result, I suspect a system that appeals to ethical systems has a better chance of long-term sustainability, because it works with the “new” default behavior online rather than bringing in the heavy, and inflexible, hand of the law.
Why you still need a (permissive) license

Norms aren’t enough if the underlying legal system might allow an early contributor to later wield the law as a threat. That’s why the best practice in the data space is to use something like the Creative Commons public domain grant (CC-Zero) to set a clear, reliable, permissive baseline, and then use norms to add flexible requirements on top of that. This uses law to provide reliability and predictability, and then uses norms to address concerns about fairness, free-riding, and effectiveness. CC-Zero still isn’t perfect; most notably it has to try to be both a grant and a license to deal with different international rules around grants.

What next?

In this context, when I say “norms”, I mean not just the general term, but specifically written norms that can act as a reference point for community members. In the data space, some good examples are DPLA’s “CCO-BY” and the Canadensys biodiversity initiative. A more subtle form can be found buried in the terms for NIH’s Clinical Trials database. So, some potential next steps, depending on where your collaborative project is:

  • If your community has informal norms (“attribution good! sharing good!”) consider writing them down like the examples above. If you’re being pressed to adopt a license (hi, Wikidata!), consider writing down norms instead, and thinking creatively about how to name and shame those who violate those norms.
  • If you’re an organization that publishes licenses, consider using your drafting prowess to write some standard norms that encapsulate the same behaviors without the clunkiness of database (or hardware) law. (Open Data Commons made some moves in this direction circa 2010, and other groups could consider doing the same.)
  • If you’re an organization that keeps getting told that people won’t participate in your project because of your license, consider moving towards a more permissive license + a norm, or interpreting your license permissively and reinforcing it with norms.

Good luck! May your data be widely re-used and contributors be excited to join your project.

Michael Catanzaro: Epiphany Icon Refresh

Planet GNOME - Hën, 26/09/2016 - 4:09md

We have a nice new app icon for Epiphany 3.24, thanks to Jakub Steiner (Update: and also Lapo Calamandrei):

Our new icon. Ignore the version numbers, it’s for 3.24.

Wow pretty!

The old icon was not actually specific to Epiphany, but was taken from the system, so it could be totally different depending on your icon theme. Here’s the icon currently used in GNOME, for comparison:

The old icon, for comparison

You can view the new icon it in its full 512×512 glory by navigating to about:web:

It’s big (click for full size)

(The old GNOME icon was a mere 256×256.)

Thanks Jakub!

Marco Barisione: Bye bye Bromium, hello Undo

Planet GNOME - Hën, 26/09/2016 - 11:36pd

In March 2015, I joined Bromium to work on a very cool security product. Unfortunately, my project was put on hold and I was not really interested in the new one, so I decided to leave.

In a couple of weeks, I will start working for Undo on their reversible debugger.
Imagine how cool it is to just wait to reproduce a bug and then step backwards to see what caused it instead of spending hours in a debugger hoping for a bug to happen! And all of this without affecting performance much!

Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

Planet GNOME - Hën, 26/09/2016 - 10:43pd

Every six months GNOME 3.22 releases and for the past six releases I’ve produced a release video to accompany our release notes.

Click the image to watch on youtube. Also available as download (Ogg Theora).

Schedule-wise a number of things were different for producing the video. I started later than usual this release. The voice-over was also produced later in the production phase than usual. In total I spent 18 days working on the video.

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by:

  1. Running the application in Fedora Rawhide with a NoDebug kernel.
  2. Attempting to build the application with JHBuild.
  3. See if a nightly flatpak exists of the application and attempt to run that.

Even then, I might run into boring problems. The rawhide packages may not be up to date or the application might not build or run. In these situations I usually attempt to get in touch with maintainers/developers but in this particular cycle I had little time on my hands to handle these issues. This unfortunately means that I had to skip including some awesome applications in this video such as properly showing GNOME Games, GNOME Builder’s profiler support and the revamped keyboard settings. Which is frustrating of course! If things went smoother with recording, I could maximize my spending time better on editing and with much more energy to do so too. In the past I have asked maintainers to record new features. This might be a nice time-saving approach since maintainers usually have their applications built and know how to showcase the new improvements. On the other hand I also know that maintainers can be just as time constrained as myself at this point in the release cycle. If you are maintainer, let me know: If I gave you a tarball with everything you need, would you be willing to spend time recording the new features you developed if I asked you?

The voice-over finished two days before release which had some interesting side-effects. By then I had already finished most of the video material and so it allowed the manuscript to be tested and modified extensively. Some sections of the release video now goes into more detail about the changes than in previous videos. The changes are also covered at slower pace and more in-depth. A big downside is that a late voiceover delays the subtitles translations tremendously due to the way the translation tools work. After submitting subtitles it’s not possible for me to change the timing, so subtitles would have to be made at a point where I can freeze the timing of the voiceover. This is unfortunately one of the last steps in the editing stage. However, thanks to the hard work of our translation teams who translated exceptionally quick this cycle, making the video available in 16 different languages 48 hours after release.

New developments in this video

Even on a tight schedule I had room to experiment with a few new things. I had some fun working on Jakub Steiner’s wallpapers in an attempt to animate them. You probably barely notice it in the video (that’s on purpose), so here’s some separate videos showing them (click the thumbnails below).



In one case I needed to change the same settings across 20 strips which blender usually can do using a “Copy to Selected” operation. This particular case was on changing a property inside a noise modifier inside a keyframe on an F-Curve for a strip – which Blender didn’t seem to support, hmm. Fortunately blender makes scripting some python easy and with the help of the internet I did so. Yes, very specific use case but very convenient if you work with noise modifiers and dont feel like manually editing 20 noise modifiers.

The top left is the python script, top right is the preview, bottom right are the overlayed image sequences and bottom left shows the opacity F-curves with noise modifiers applied to them to change color randomly over time.

This cycle I put more of the work into the VSE instead of the 3D view which both saved me some time and cost me some time. One one hand it means less in-between render steps and this saves time if what I want to do is something simple animation-wise anyway. On the other hand it prolongs the final render time which can be cumbersome if you just want to render a preview of the video. The key probably is to find a balance here.

Rendering the release video (CC-BY-SA 4.0)

Thanks to Karen and Mike for working on the amazing voiceover, the GNOME Design Team for providing graphical assets, the translation team for translations, the engagement team for feedback and Jonathan Yamoty for the background music. And thanks to everyone who contributed improvements to GNOME this cycle! For me, making the release video and is not only about promoting the new version but also about celebrating the awesome contributions by the community. This is my contribution to help giving everyone renewed energy and make next release even better.

Jim Hall: Great first year at LAS GNOME!

Planet GNOME - Dje, 25/09/2016 - 11:26md
This was the first year of the Libre Application Summit, hosted by GNOME (aka "LAS GNOME"). Congratulations to the LAS GNOME team for a successful launch of this new conference! I hope to see more of them.

In case you missed LAS GNOME, the conference was in Portland, Oregon. I thoroughly enjoyed this very walkable city. Portland is a great place for a conference venue. When I booked my hotel, I found lots of hotel options within easy walking distance to the LAS GNOME location. I walked every day, but you could also take any of the many light rail or bus or trolley options running throughout the city.

I encourage you to review this year's conference schedule to learn about the different presentations. I'll share only a few highlights of my own. I also live-tweeted through many of the presentations, and I'll share some of those tweets here:

Not quite live tweeting, but will be tweeting frequently from @LASGNOME over the next few days.#LASGNOME— Jim Hall (@jimfhall) September 19, 2016
Alexander Larsson gave a great presentation ("Taking back the apps from the distributions") about Flatpak. I'd followed Flatpak before, but until Alexander's presentation, I never really grokked what Flatpak can do for us. With Flatpak, anyone can provide an application or app anywhere, on any distribution.

Opening keynote. Linux Flatpak gives cross-distro, sandboxes, invisible to users. Allows anyone to ship application to anywhere. #LASGNOME— Jim Hall (@jimfhall) September 19, 2016
Today, you may be comfortable installing whatever application you need through your distribution. But what if your distribution doesn't provide the application you are looking for? And what if you want to run an application that a distribution isn't likely to want to provide (such as a commercial third-party office application or game)? In these cases, you either hope the person providing the application can provide a package for your distribution, or you go without.

With Flatpak, you can bundle an application to run on any Linux distribution, and it should just run. I see this as a huge opportunity for indie games on Linux! Imagine the next version of PuzzleQuest also being available for Linux, or a version of Worms for Linux, or a version of Inside for Linux. With Flatpak, these indie developers could bundle up their apps for Linux—and sell them.

Really excited to see if game devs will use @FlatpakApps to distrib games, esp indie freemium games. Seems like perfect platform! #LASGNOME— Jim Hall (@jimfhall) September 19, 2016
Also, a great thing about going to conferences is the opportunity to finally meet people you've only chatted with online. Ciarrai was one of my interns during the May-August cycle of Outreachy, and we finally got to meet at LAS GNOME! We had been emailed back and forth in the weeks ahead of time, since we knew we'd both be there. But it was great to finally meet them in person!

LAS GNOME had scheduled talks in the morning, and "unconference" topics in the afternoon. With an "unconference," people suggest topics for an impromptu presentation or workshop, and attendees vote on them.

In the afternoon of day 1, I hosted an informal workshop on usability testing, at the same time my friend Asheesh gave an unconference presentation on web app packaging in Sandstorm. I was surprised to see so many developers at my how-to presentation about usability testing. Thanks to all who attended! Scott snapped this selfie of the two of us:

Just did a great #unconference session about how to do #usability testing. Thanks! #LASGNOME— Jim Hall (@jimfhall) September 20, 2016
On day 2, Asheesh Laroia gave a presentation ("How to make open source web apps viable") about Sandstorm. Asheesh and I have known each other for a few years now, and I've followed his work with Sandstorm. But it was great to see Asheesh walk us through a demo of Sandstorm to really show off what it can do. In short, Sandstorm provides an open source software platform that helps people collaborate over the web.

And Sandstorm is designed with several layers of security, so it's very locked down. Even if you can "break out" of one web application, you can't get elsewhere on the system. As Asheesh put it during his talk, it's like Google Docs, but more secure:

Great summary: "Sandstorm is like Google Docs but more private." @asheeshlaroia #LASGNOME— Jim Hall (@jimfhall) September 20, 2016
On day 3, Stephano Cetola shared a wonderful story about how he got involved in open source software and made it his career ("Endless Summer of Code: Getting Involved in OSS"). I loved how Stephano talked about his experimental nature, and how he learned about technology by letting the "magic smoke" out of things.

Because of his eagerness and willingness to learn, Stephano found new opportunities to grow—eventually landing a position where he works for Intel, working on the Yocto project. A great journey that was a joy to experience!

Stephano's talk was engaging, humorous, and interesting- three things for an enjoyable presentation! #LASGNOME https://t.co/FVMZFAKylq— Jim Hall (@jimfhall) September 21, 2016
Finally, I gave my presentation on usability testing for GNOME ("GNOME Usability Testing"). I opened by talking about different ways (direct and indirect) that you can test usability of software. From there, I gave an overview of the Outreachy internship, and what Renata, Ciarrai and Diana worked on as part of their internships.

I was thrilled for Ciarrai to share their part of usability testing from this cycle of Outreachy. Ciarrai's project was a paper prototype test of a new version of GNOME Settings. Renata conducted a traditional usability test of other ongoing work in GNOME, and Diana worked on a User eXperience (UX) test of GNOME.

Ciarrai did an outstanding job sharing their paper prototype #usability test from @outreachy - yay!#LASGNOME https://t.co/fzf32PaUaL— Jim Hall (@jimfhall) September 21, 2016
I think my presentation went well, and we had a lot of great questions. Thanks to everyone!

Again, congratulations to the LAS GNOME team for a successful first year!
image: LAS GNOME
photo: Scott

Ignacio Casal Quinteiro: Wing

Planet GNOME - Dje, 25/09/2016 - 1:37md

Wing is a library which provides GLib-like API to some Windows API.

The goal of this library is twofold:

  • provide GLib-friendly integration points with Windows specific concepts
  • be a testing ground for API that may be included in GLib/GIO/Gtk+ once they are proven to be generally useful

Currently it already provides api for:

  • Named pipes
  • Windows services
  • A GSource to poll from windows handles
  • Utilities to get the type of operating system and the version.

You can find the git repository in: https://git.gnome.org/browse/wing

As usual if you are interested in this library, patches are very welcomed.

 

Jiri Eischmann: We’re looking for a GNOME developer

Planet GNOME - Pre, 23/09/2016 - 5:24md

We in the Red Hat desktop team are looking for a junior software developer who will work on GNOME. Particularly in printing and document viewing areas of the project.

The location of the position is Brno, Czech Republic, where you’d join a truly international team of desktop developers. It’s a junior position, so candidates just off the university, or even still studying are welcome. We require solid English communication skills and experience with C (and ideally C++, too). But what is a huge plus is experience with GNOME development and participation in the community.

Interested? You can directly apply for the position at jobs.redhat.com or if you have any question, you can write me: eischmann [] redhat [] com.


Senate Panel Authorizes Money For Mission To Mars

Slashdot.org - Pre, 23/09/2016 - 9:00pd
An anonymous reader quotes a report from USA Today: With a new president on the horizon, a key Senate committee moved Wednesday to protect long-standing priorities of the nation's space program from the potential upheaval of an incoming administration. Members of the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee passed a bipartisan bill authorizing $19.5 billion to continue work on a Mars mission and efforts to send astronauts on private rockets to the International Space Station from U.S. soil -- regardless of shifting political winds. Under the Senate bill, NASA would have an official goal of sending a crewed mission to Mars within the next 25 years, the first time a trip to the Red Planet would be mandated by law. The legislation would authorize money for different NASA components, including $4.5 billion for exploration, nearly $5 billion for space operations and $5.4 billion for science. Beyond money, the measure would: Direct NASA to continue working on the Space Launch System and Orion multi-purpose vehicle that are the linchpins of a planned mission to send astronauts to Mars by the 2030s. The bill includes specific milestones for an unmanned exploration mission by 2018 and a crewed exploration mission by 2021. Require development of an advanced space suit to protect astronauts on a Mars mission. Continue development of the Commercial Crew Program designed to send astronauts to the space station -- no later than 2018 -- on private rockets launched from U.S. soil. Expand the full use and life of the space station through 2024 while laying the foundation for use through 2028. Allow greater opportunities for aerospace companies to conduct business in Low Earth Orbit. Improve monitoring, diagnosis and treatment of the medical effects astronauts experience from spending time in deep space.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Oculus Founder Palmer Luckey Is Secretly Funding Trump's Meme Machine

Slashdot.org - Pre, 23/09/2016 - 5:30pd
The founder of Oculus, Palmer Luckey, has backed a pro-Trump political organization called Nimble America that is dedicated to "shitposting" and spreading inflammatory memes about Hillary Clinton. In 2014, Luckey's virtual-reality company, Oculus, was acquired by Facebook for $2 billion. Forbes estimates his current net worth to be $700 million. The Daily Beast reports: "The 24-year-old told The Daily Beast that he had used the pseudonym "NimbleRichMan" on Reddit with a password given to him by the organization's founders. Nimble America says it's dedicated to providing that "shitposting is powerful and meme magic is real," according to the company's introductory statement, and has taken credit for a billboard its founders say was posted outside of Pittsburgh with a cartoonishly large image of Clinton's face alongside the words "Too Big to Jail." "We conquered Reddit and drive narrative on social media, conquered the [mainstream media], now it's time to get our most delicious memes in front of Americans whether they like it or not," a representative for the group wrote in an introductory post on Reddit. Potential donors from Donald Trump's biggest online community -- Reddit's r/The_Donald, where one of the rules is "no dissenters" -- turned on the organization this weekend, refusing to believe "NimbleRichMan" was the anonymous "near-billionaire" he claimed to be and causing a rift on one of the alt-right's most powerful organizational tools. Luckey insists he's just the group's money man -- a wealthy booster who thought the meddlesome idea was funny. But he is also listed as the vice-president of the group on its website. In another post written under Luckey's Reddit pseudonym, Luckey echoes Peter Thiel, the tech billionaire who used his wealth to secretly bankroll Hulk Hogan's lawsuit against Gawker. The Daily Beast adds: "'The American Revolution was funded by wealthy individuals," NimbleRichMan wrote on Saturday. Luckey confirmed to The Daily Beast he penned the posts under his Reddit pseudonym. 'The same has been true of many movements for freedom in history. You can't fight the American elite without serious firepower. They will outspend you and destroy you by any and all means.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Tesla Sues Michigan Over Sales Ban

Slashdot.org - Pre, 23/09/2016 - 3:30pd
An anonymous reader quotes a report from USA Today: Electric automaker Tesla Motors filed a lawsuit Thursday against Michigan state officials, escalating its multi-year battle to sell vehicles directly to consumers. Tesla's action comes less than a week after Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson effectively rejected the automaker's application for dealership and service facilities by asking for proof that Tesla is a franchised dealer. Tesla, unlike other automakers, sells its cars directly to consumers through company-owned stores in other states. "Tesla Motors brings this lawsuit to vindicate its rights under the United States constitution to sell and service its critically-acclaimed, all-electric vehicles at Tesla owned facilities in the State of Michigan," the automaker said in its complaint in federal court. The California automaker named Johnson, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder and Attorney General Bill Schuette as defendants. Tesla submitted an application for a dealership license in fall 2015 with a plan to open a retail gallery in Grand Rapids, Mich. In a Sept. 7 hearing, a panel of administrative law examiners heard arguments. Last Thursday, they rejected the license for Tesla. "The license was denied because state law explicitly requires a dealer to have a bona fide contract with an auto manufacturer to sell its vehicles," Johnson said in a statement. Tesla wants to sell its high-end battery-powered cars directly to consumers without a franchised dealer, much like Apple sells its products. The automaker's lawsuit asks a federal judge to declare that the state violated the due process and equal protection clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment and the constitution's commerce clause. Snyder signed a law in October, 2014, that prohibited Tesla from selling cars directly to consumers by requiring all automakers to sell through a network of franchised dealers.

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Google Play Starts Bringing Android Apps To Chromebooks

Slashdot.org - Pre, 23/09/2016 - 2:50pd
An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: As promised, Google has finally brought the Google Play store to Chrome OS. Android apps, Android games, and media content from the store are all now finally available on Chromebooks running the latest stable build. But that still doesn't mean all Chromebook owners can use the store. This continues to be a gradual rollout -- even on the stable channel, Google is limiting the launch in multiple ways. "A beta release of the Play store is available to users now on the Acer R11 and Asus Flip (and coming soon to Pixel 2015) and can be enabled from the Settings page," a Google spokesperson told VentureBeat. "The team is hard at work making the experience great for users before making the Play Store available by default on these Chromebooks." That's right -- even though we're still talking about just three devices, the Play store is disabled by default. Once you've updated to version 53.0.2785.129 (make sure to switch back to the stable channel if you aren't already on it), you'll have to enable the Play Store in Chrome Settings.

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SolidRun x86 Braswell MicroSoM Runs Linux and Full Windows 10, Destroys Raspberry Pi

Slashdot.org - Pre, 23/09/2016 - 2:10pd
BetaNews has a report today about a company called SolidRun, which has announced an Intel Braswell-based MicroSoM. Unlike the ARM-powered Raspberry Pi, this is x86 compatible, meaning it can run full Windows 10. Plus, if you install a Linux distro, there will be far more packages available, such as Google Chrome, which is not available for Pi. Heck, it can probably serve as a secondary desktop, Brian with the site writes. From the report: At 53mm by 40mm, these new MicroSoMs provide unheard of design flexibility while also eliminating the headache of having to design complicated power-delivery subsystems thanks to its single power input rail design. SolidRun's Braswell MicroSoM also offers flexibility in RAM options, ranging from 1GB to 8GB configurations, and offers on-board support of eMMC storage up to 128GB. Its robust design and unsurpassed HD Edge surveillance, event detection, and statistical data-extraction capabilities makes it the platform of choice for mission-critical applications requiring guaranteed reliability," says Solidrun.It starts at $117, the website has more details on specifications.

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TypeScript 2.0 Released

Slashdot.org - Pre, 23/09/2016 - 1:30pd
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Since its introduction, TypeScript has included new features to improve performance, enhance JavaScript compatibility, and extend the range of error checking that the TypeScript compiler performs. TypeScript 2.0 introduces a big step forward here by giving developers greater control over null values. null, used to denote (in some broad, hand-waving sense) that a variable holds no value at all, has been called the billion dollar mistake. Time and time again, programs trip up by not properly checking to see if a variable is null, and for good or ill, every mainstream programming language continues to support the null concept. TypeScript 2.0 brings a range of new features, but the biggest is control over these null values. With TypeScript 2.0, programmers can opt into a new behavior that by default prevents values from being null. With this option enabled, variables by default will be required to have a value and can't be set to null accidentally. This in turn allows the compiler to find other errors such as variables that are never initialized.

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Taiwan Asks Google To Blur Its Military Facilities In South China Sea

Slashdot.org - Pre, 23/09/2016 - 12:50pd
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Reuters: Taiwan's defense ministry said on Wednesday it is asking Google to blur satellite images showing what experts say appear to be new military installations on Itu Aba, Taipei's sole holding in the disputed South China Sea. The revelation of new military-related construction could raise tensions in the contested waterway, where China's building of airstrips and other facilities has worried other claimants and the United States. The images seen on Google Earth show four three-pronged structures sitting in a semi-circle just off the northwestern shoreline of Itu Aba, across from an upgraded airstrip and recently constructed port that can dock 3,000-ton frigates. "Under the pre-condition of protecting military secrets and security, we have requested Google blur images of important military facilities," Taiwan Defense Ministry spokesman Chen Chung-chi said on Wednesday, after local media published the images on Itu Aba. The United States has urged against the militarization of the South China Sea, following the rapid land reclamation by China on several disputed reefs through dredging, and building air fields and port facilities. Defense experts in Taiwan said that based on the imagery of the structures and their semi-circular layout, the structures were likely related to defense and could be part of an artillery foundation.

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Verizon Says It Knows You Don't Need Unlimited Data

Slashdot.org - Pre, 23/09/2016 - 12:10pd
Ed Oswald, writing for DigitalTrends: While the wireless industry is moving back to unlimited data, one carrier is not. Verizon chief financial officer Fred Shammo told attendees at the Goldman Sachs Communacopia Conference in New York on Thursday that his company doesn't think you need it, and slammed current offerings. "At the end of the day, people don't need unlimited plans," Shammo said. While this is not the first time he's said this -- in March he claimed unlimited data "doesn't work in an LTE environment," and in 2011 he helped Verizon move away from unlimited plans -- it's now an entirely different market.

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Stephen Hawking Wants To Find Aliens Before They Find Us

Slashdot.org - Enj, 22/09/2016 - 11:30md
Stephen Hawking is again reminding people that perhaps shouting about our existence to aliens is not the right way to go about it, especially if those aliens are more technologically advanced. In his new half-hour program dubbed, Stephen Hawking's Favorite Places, the theoretical physicist and cosmologist said (via CNET):"If intelligent life has evolved (on Gliese 832c), we should be able to hear it," he says while hovering over the exoplanet in the animated "U.S.S. Hawking." "One day we might receive a signal from a planet like this, but we should be wary of answering back. Meeting an advanced civilization could be like Native Americans encountering Columbus. That didn't turn out so well." Hawking manages to be both worried about exposing our civilization to aliens and excited about finding them. He supports not only Breakthrough: Listen, but also Breakthrough: Starshot, another initiative that aims to send tiny nanocraft to our closest neighboring star system, which was recently found to have an Earth-like planet.

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19-Year-Old Jailbreaks iPhone 7 In 24 Hours

Slashdot.org - Enj, 22/09/2016 - 10:50md
An anonymous reader writes: 19-year-old hacker qwertyoruiop, aka Luca Todesco, jailbroke the new iPhone 7 just 24 hours after he got it, in what's the first known iPhone 7 jailbreak. Todesco tweeted a screenshot of a terminal where he has "root," alongside the message: "This is a jailbroken iPhone 7." He even has video proof of the jailbreak. Motherboard reports: "He also said that he could definitely submit the vulnerabilities he found to Apple, since they fall under the newly launched bug bounty, but he hasn't decided whether to do that yet. The hacker told me that he needs to polish the exploits a bit more to make the jailbreak 'smoother,' and that he is also planning to make this jailbreak work through the Safari browser just like the famous 'jailbreakme.com,' which allowed anyone to jailbreak their iPhone 4 just by clicking on a link." Apple responded to the news by saying, "Apple strongly cautions against installing any software that hacks iOS."

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Hacker Leaks Michelle Obama's Passport

Slashdot.org - Enj, 22/09/2016 - 10:10md
The hacker who leaked Colin Powell's private email account last week has struck again. This time they have hacked a low-level White House staffer and released a picture of Michelle Obama's passport, along with detailed schedules for top U.S. officials and private email messages. New York Post reports: The information has been posted online by the group DC Leaks. The White House staffer -- who also apparently does advance work for Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign -- is named Ian Mellul. The released documents include a PowerPoint outline of Vice President Joe Biden's recent Cleveland trip, showing his planned route, where he'll meet with individuals and other sensitive information, according to the Daily Mail. In an email to The Post, the hacker writes, "The leaked files show the security level of our government. If terrorists hack emails of White House Office staff and get such sensitive information we will see the fall of our country." The hacker adds, "We hope you will tell the people about this criminal negligence of White House Office staffers."

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