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Military Caught Training Children To Fight

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 6:30md
Locke writes: Our culture's military might has been unquestioned for years. But a new investigative report from the New England newsnet is casting an unpleasant light on military training efforts. What started out as a simple endeavor to track down a handful of kids for an unrelated story has turned into one of the most shocking scandals of our time, as reporters were unable to find the children literally anywhere on Earth. It's been revealed that a series of rocket launches has been carting classes of children off the planet to undergo intense battle preparations in null gravity. Calls for greater transparency have been met with silence, and several reporters visiting military bases for quotes have not returned. There could even be political ramifications — after ground-based telescopes sought out and found what appears to be an orbital training complex, the New Warsaw Pact has begun demanding answers. This could destabilize the fragile peace that has held far longer than anyone expected. The biggest remaining question is: why kids? There are plenty of adults willing to dedicate their lives to defending against the Bugger threat, so why spend an unfathomable amount of money to train undeveloped, uncoordinated children? Surely even the military understands kids are not mentally equipped to handle the pressures of real combat. More details to follow.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

It's Time To Open Your Eyes

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 5:48md
Morpheus writes: Good morning. I'm talking to you. Yes, you. The one with the squeaking chair and the monitor that needs cleaning. Right now you're wondering why your officemates haven't mentioned the weird story on Slashdot's front page. They haven't mentioned it because they can't see it. Not everyone can accept reality as it is. But you can. You know. You've always known. The things you see, the things you hear, and smell — they aren't any more real than your dreams. You've drifted through life so far wondering when you're going to wake up. But you don't have to wonder anymore. This is your alarm clock. The only decision you have left to make — the only decision you've ever had to make — is whether you want to wake up, or turn it off and drift back to sleep. In exactly two minutes, your phone is going to ring. If you want to open your eyes, to be born into a world more real than you've ever imagined.. answer it.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

If You Thought Studying History Was Bad, This Math Professor Is Making It Harder

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 5:09md
Raven writes: New research out of Streeling University aims to make planning for the future much easier. The work, led by professor Seldon, tries to set probabilistic values on future events, and then weigh those probabilities against each other to figure out what combination of events is most likely to happen. Describing it under the unlikely moniker "psychohistory," Seldon seems to think planning even 10,000 years into the future might be possible. (Seldon also seems to be a bit of a doomsayer, so this is likely exaggerated.) Nevertheless, it'll be another tool for government planners to consider when developing new colonies.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Coup in Arrakis Capitol Leaves Region in Flux

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 4:27md
Rube_Goldberg_Mentat writes: The power struggles between rival houses Atreides and Harkonnen have come to a T. It was reported earlier today that a coup led by Baron Vladimir Harkonnen was staged in the capitol of Arrakis. The House Atreides, which had only recently taken command of the planet and of the spice trade, is reported to have no survivors, though this is yet to be confirmed.Naysayers fear a collapse of the spice economy as a result of the violence. A r presentative from House Harkonnen has shared with the press that though times ahead may be rocky, "the spice will still flow."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Man-Shaped Robots Harass Britain Once Again

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 3:43md
NotRicky writes: The UK's terrible string of luck with violent robots continues. The man-shaped metal monstrosities that have plagued the country at seemingly random times throughout history rose up once more yesterday. No one yet knows their source, or what phenomenon — natural or man-made — keeps drawing them to that area of the world. While initial reports indicated trillions of dollars worth of damage and countless lives lost, the re-establishment of communications paints a much more hopeful picture. The British government remains quiet about the situation, politely refusing foreign aid and letting one of their intelligence agencies direct efforts to restore order. Reporters and camera crews are having difficulty documenting the situation — it's not clear whether this is due to interference from the government or simply the chaotic nature of the robot uprising. A medical professional on the scene was quoted as saying, "It's simple, really — even the flattened brick you call a computer can undelete, can't it?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Corporation Investigates Spurious Signal -- What They Found Will Shock You

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 2:58md
Mother_01101 writes: The Weyland-Yutani Corporation announced today one of the most fantastic discoveries in human existence: alien life! Colony LV-426 made first contact, and one of W-Y Corp's long-term research vessels, Nostromo, has gone to provide assistance and bring these life forms home to engage in peaceful learning and negotiation. Initial reports from Nostromo indicate all has gone well, though they're now under radio silence for security purposes. W-Y Corp says they will, of course, honor all quarantine procedures and do everything they can to make sure the transition goes smoothly. Their CEO reminded us: "Safety is paramount!"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Tatooine Youth Suspected In Terrorist Attack

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 2:12md
BeruHadItComing writes: Imperial investigators are still trying to piece together what happened in last week's horrifying terrorist attack on our largest orbital defense station. Over a million loyal citizens, scientists, and medical staff lost their lives in the grisly attack while the station was being put through training exercises near the Yavin system. Billions more are in mourning, while a number of powerful senators have renewed calls to increase defense spending. Initial reports have confirmed Rebel involvement, and officials are making inquiries about a young insurgent from Tatooine with known ties to religious fundamentalists.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Raphael Geissert: Special guest for the Lyon minidebconf, 2015

Planet Debian - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 1:28md
It appears that this year's MiniDebconf in Lyon, France is going to have a very special guest. After enjoying so much the Q&A held at Debconf14, Linus Torvalds has decided to make a quick detour from a trip to Europe to bring the opportunity for another session with the Debian community.

The event has yet to appear in the MiniDebconf agenda. Rumor has it that the hurds of fans that tend to attend his events pose a logistics and safety challenge, reason why the event might only appear in the agenda a couple of days before the event.
Lyon being such an easy place to get by train, flight, car, and even by boat, it is understandable and should be expected that a great number of people attend the minidebconf only for his very session.

If you have not yet registered, I'd recommend you to do so now and to book your travel and accommodation ASAP, before everything is overpriced due to high demand.

See you in ten days!

P.S. kudos to the organizers!

Riccardo Padovani: My opensource contributions in March 15

Planet UBUNTU - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 11:54pd

This month was amazing: first Ubuntu Phones reached users, and so now we have feedbacks from actual customers, and we’re seeing platform growing.

If you have published any app on the Ubuntu Store you know what I’m talking about: in last two weeks there were a lot of new downloads by new users. In this moment 100 balls, a little game I published, has more than 1200 download by something like 1000 users (actually, 936).

If I think where we were 2 years ago, it all seems a miracle: community and Canonical are doing a great work together, and we finally reached the market with a real device, and others are coming. Wow!

Stats

First of all, thanks to all you who follow me, this blog has a number of visitors I never expect. I know I say that every month, but every month is a surprise. When I reboot this blog three months ago, my expectation was to have 4000 page view every month. Without calculating who read articles on Ubuntu Planet or in a RSS Reader, this blog had 26,866 page views by 5,916 unique visitors in 30 days. Thanks to all! And I only wrote 2 articles!

Stats are calculated by CloudFare, I don’t have Analytics or others trackers on the site. It just counts the number of request it has. And I think this is the last month I use CloudFare, as I describe below

VPS

As I mentioned last month, I used your donations to buy a VPS. I’m still configuring it, but I’ve already installed OwnCloud and an irc bouncer and a webmail. It still misses the website itself, and then some tests to see performances.

When it will be live I’ll write a post about the configuration, with all details.

This is only thanks to your donations, I’ve no words to say how much grateful I am. I’ll continue to do my best to make Ubuntu better, thanks for your support.

Donations

In March I received 55 euros in donations. It’s astonishing. I really, really appreciate to see my work is appreciated so much. I’ll can pay a good VPS, and have some good Italian coffees to have more energy to contribute opensource projects :-)

What I did

Some of you already know: in March I did surgery to the left eye to correct myopia: it was a success (also the one I did in February to right eye) and it’s amazing to see without glasses.

Now, it’s time to describe what I did in March. Considering the surgery, the uni and life in general I’m satisfied about what I did.

Browser app

The month start was a bit frustrating: I was working on new tab improvements, but I found a lot of upstream bugs in Qt, and I wasn’t able to land improvements I did. I tried different approaches to the problem, but every approach hit a different upstream bug. Unfortunately, I’m not good enough to fix upstream bugs: I took a look, but Qt code isn’t simple.

Luckily, after a couple of weeks, Olivier (main browser app developer) said me to leave that branch, for now, and focus on settings. He implemented settings in the backend itself and found a very elegant qml solution to manage search engines (I was writing a long C++ class to do that), and I wrote the UI for settings.

The branch has been approved yesterday night: I know in some parts of the world was already April, but here was still March, so it’s one of the March’s contribution I’m most proud of.

Thanks to oSoMoN for the mentorship and the patience reviewing my branches and suggesting me best practices.

Calculator Reboot

Do you think your app is perfect? Then popey hasn’t tested it yet! So you fix all bugs popey found, and you think you’ve done, but then there is Joe, the product manager. And he will find user cases you have never think to.

So we’re continuing to fix bugs, and I hope we will able to include it in the OTA update of next week. Quality of apps has to be very high to be included in the default image, so we want to fix all bugs before releasing it. It’s not easy, but we’re near enough.

At the moment we have only one blocking bug about keyboard, and I hope to fix it today or tomorrow. If I’ll able to fix it, then the calculator app will be pushed to thousands of phones next week. No pressure at all.

Meanwhile, you can test it on your phone looking for Ubuntu Calculator App Reboot on the store. Please leave us your feedbacks, so we can improve it :-)

Reminders

Michael Zanetti worked hard on reminders last month, and a lot of improvements will land in next OTA image (we hope). I reviewed all its branches, and it’s a luck for me: I learn lot of things doing reviews, probably it’s the best way to improve my code skills: of course, then I have to try to use what I read!

Other than that, I did usual things: bugs report, a very little patch for Telegram, some code for ubuntu-it, promotion of Ubuntu on social networks, support on Italian forum and on IRC and so on.

Have you ever thought about helping the Ubuntu development? There are a lot of things to do, and you don’t have to be a developer: we need translators, testers, promoters and so. Try to take a look here, and, if you have any doubt, write me. I’ll be more than happy to address you to the right place to start to contribute.

Just think: two years ago, when I started to do things for Ubuntu Phone, I knew very little about developing world, and know I’m doing cool things that reach thousands of users. Wow!

Someone asked me how to start, well, I have no good suggestion: find something you like, and try to improve it. As soon as I’ve time I write a blog post with my story, maybe for someone could be useful: but remember, you have to create your own story, don’t copy others, it’s useless. Be yourself and try to change the world in your way :-)

You know, I’m a student and I do all this in my free time. So, if you like my work and want to support me, just send me a Thank you! by email or offer me a beer:-)

Ciao,
R.

California Has Become the First State To Get Over 5% of Its Power From Solar

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 11:11pd
Lucas123 writes: While the rest of the nation's solar power generation hovers around 1%, California clocked in with a record 5% of power coming from utility-grade (1MW or more) solar power sources, according to a report from Mercom Capital Group and the Energy Information Administration. That's three times the next closest state, Arizona. At the same time, 22 states have yet to deploy even one utility-grade solar power plant, according to the Solar Energy Industry Association. Meanwhile, the rest of the world saw a 14% uptick in solar power installations in 2014 for a total of 54.5GW of capacity, and that figure is expected to grow even faster in 2015. While China still leads the world in new solar capacity, Japan and the U.S. come in as a close second and third, respectively. In the U.S. distributed solar and utility-grade solar installations are soaring as the solar investment tax credit (ITC) is set to expire next year. The U.S. is expected to deploy 8.5GW of new solar capacity in 2015, according to Mercom Capital Group.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

5 keys to hiring security talent

LinuxSecurity.com - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 10:26pd
LinuxSecurity.com: Hiring (and retaining) data security talent is one of the toughest jobs today, especially after a slew of high-profile data breaches that have driven demand and salaries sky-high. Robert S. Allen, chief security officer at CNA, a major commercial insurance carrier, is tackling that challenge by making sure his company has an attractive story to tell job candidates.

DDoS Attack Against GitHub Continues After More Than Four Days

LinuxSecurity.com - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 10:24pd
LinuxSecurity.com: More than four days after it began, the massive DDoS attack on GitHub is still ongoing. The attack has evolved significantly since it started and GitHub officials said they believe that the goal of the operation is to force the site to remove some specific content.

MongoDB Patches Remote Denial-of-Service Vulnerability

LinuxSecurity.com - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 10:22pd
LinuxSecurity.com: MongoDB, a popular NoSQL database used in big data and heavy analytics environments, has patched a serious denial-of-service vulnerability that is remotely exploitable.

Raphaël Hertzog: My Free Software Activities in March 2015

Planet Debian - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 10:10pd

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

Debian LTS

This month I have been paid to work 15.25 hours on Debian LTS. In that time I did the following:

  • CVE triage: I pushed 37 commits to the security tracker and contacted 20 maintainers about security issues affecting their packages.
  • I started a small helper script based on the new JSON output of the security tracker (see #761859 for details). It’s not ready yet but will make it easier to detect issues where the LTS team lags behind the security team, and other divergences like this and will speed up future CVE triage work (once done).
  • I sent DLA-174-1 (tcpdump update fixing 3 CVE) after having received a debdiff from the Romain Françoise.
  • I prepared DLA-175-1 on gnupg, fixing 3 CVE.
  • I prepared DLA-180-1 on gnutls26, fixing 3 CVE.

That’s it for the paid work. But still about LTS, I proposed two events for Debconf 15:

In my last Freexian LTS report, I mentioned briefly that it would be nice to have a logo for the LTS project. Shortly after I got a first logo prepared by Damien Escoffier and a few more followed: they are available on a wiki page (and the logo you see above is from him!). Following a suggestion of Paul Wise, I registered the logo request on another wiki page dedicated to artwork requests. That kind of collaboration is awesome! Thanks to all the artists involved in Debian.

Debian packaging

Django. This month has seen no less than 3 upstream point releases packaged for Debian (1.7.5, 1.7.6 and 1.7.7) and they have been accepted by the release team into Jessie. I’m pleased with this tolerance as I have argued the case for it multiple times in the past given the sane upstream release policy (bugfix only in a given released branch).

Python code analysis. I discovered a few months ago a tool combining the power of multiple Python code analysis tools: it’s prospector. I just filed a “Request for Package” for it (see #781165) and someone already volunteered to package it, yay \o/

update-rc.d and systemd. While working on a Kali version based on Jessie, I got hit by what boils down to a poor interaction between systemd and update-rc.d (see #746580) and after some exchanges with other affected users I raised the severity to serious as we really ought to do something about it before release. I also opened #781155 on openbsd-inetd as its usage of inetd.service instead of openbsd-inetd.service (which is only provided as a symlink to the former) leads to multiple small issues.

Misc

Debian France. The general assembly is over and the new board elected its new president: it’s now official, I’m no longer Debian France’s president. Good luck to Nicolas Dandrimont who took on this responsibility.

Salt’s openssh formula. I improved salt’s openssh formula to make it possible to manage the /etc/ssh/ssh_known_hosts file referencing the public SSH keys of other managed minions.

Tendenci.com. I was looking for a free software solution to handle membership management of a large NPO and I discovered Tendenci. It looked very interesting feature wise and written with a language/framework that I enjoy (Python/Django). But while it’s free software, there’s no community at all. The company that wrote it released it under a free software license and it really looks like that they did intend to build a community but they failed at it. When I looked their “development forums” were web-based and mostly empty with only initial discussion of the current developers and no reply from anybody… there’s also no mention of an IRC channel or a mailing list. I sent them a mail to see what kind of collaboration we could expect if we opted for their software and got no reply. A pity, really.

What free software membership management solution would you use when you have more than 10000 members to handle and when you want to use the underlying database to offer SSO authentication to multiple external services?

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

2 comments | Liked this article? Click here. | My blog is Flattr-enabled.

Raphaël Hertzog: My Free Software Activities in March 2015

Planet UBUNTU - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 10:10pd

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

Debian LTS

This month I have been paid to work 15.25 hours on Debian LTS. In that time I did the following:

  • CVE triage: I pushed 37 commits to the security tracker and contacted 20 maintainers about security issues affecting their packages.
  • I started a small helper script based on the new JSON output of the security tracker (see #761859 for details). It’s not ready yet but will make it easier to detect issues where the LTS team lags behind the security team, and other divergences like this and will speed up future CVE triage work (once done).
  • I sent DLA-174-1 (tcpdump update fixing 3 CVE) after having received a debdiff from the Romain Françoise.
  • I prepared DLA-175-1 on gnupg, fixing 3 CVE.
  • I prepared DLA-180-1 on gnutls26, fixing 3 CVE.

That’s it for the paid work. But still about LTS, I proposed two events for Debconf 15:

In my last Freexian LTS report, I mentioned briefly that it would be nice to have a logo for the LTS project. Shortly after I got a first logo prepared by Damien Escoffier and a few more followed: they are available on a wiki page (and the logo you see above is from him!). Following a suggestion of Paul Wise, I registered the logo request on another wiki page dedicated to artwork requests. That kind of collaboration is awesome! Thanks to all the artists involved in Debian.

Debian packaging

Django. This month has seen no less than 3 upstream point releases packaged for Debian (1.7.5, 1.7.6 and 1.7.7) and they have been accepted by the release team into Jessie. I’m pleased with this tolerance as I have argued the case for it multiple times in the past given the sane upstream release policy (bugfix only in a given released branch).

Python code analysis. I discovered a few months ago a tool combining the power of multiple Python code analysis tools: it’s prospector. I just filed a “Request for Package” for it (see #781165) and someone already volunteered to package it, yay \o/

update-rc.d and systemd. While working on a Kali version based on Jessie, I got hit by what boils down to a poor interaction between systemd and update-rc.d (see 746580) and after some exchanges with other affected users I raised the severity to serious as we really ought to do something about it before release. I also opened
#781155 on openbsd-inetd as its usage of inetd.service instead of openbsd-inetd.service (which is only provided as a symlink to the former) leads to multiple small issues.

Misc

Debian France. The general assembly is over and the new board elected its new president: it’s now official, I’m no longer Debian France’s president. Good luck to Nicolas Dandrimont who took on this responsibility.

Salt’s openssh formula. I improved salt’s openssh formula to make it possible to manage the /etc/ssh/ssh_known_hosts file referencing the public SSH keys of other managed minions.

Tendenci.com. I was looking for a free software solution to handle membership management of a large NPO and I discovered Tendenci. It looked very interesting feature wise and written with a language/framework that I enjoy (Python/Django). But while it’s free software, there’s no community at all. The company that wrote it released it under a free software license and it really looks like that they did intend to build a community but they failed at it. When I looked their “development forums” were web-based and mostly empty with only initial discussion of the current developers and no reply from anybody… there’s also no mention of an IRC channel or a mailing list. I sent them a mail to see what kind of collaboration we could expect if we opted for their software and got no reply. A pity, really.

What free software membership management solution would you use when you have more than 10000 members to handle and when you want to use the underlying database to offer SSO authentication to multiple external services?

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

No comment | Liked this article? Click here. | My blog is Flattr-enabled.

Angry Boss Phishing Emails Prompt Fraudulent Wire Transfers

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 9:35pd
chicksdaddy writes: Lots of studies have shown that assertiveness works in the professional sphere as well as the personal one. It turns out to work pretty well in the cyber criminal sphere, also. Websense Labs has posted a blog warning of a new round of spear phishing attacks that rely on e-mail messages posing as urgent communications from senior officers to lower level employees. The messages demand that the employees wire funds to a destination account provided in the message. According to Websense, these attacks are low tech. The fraudsters register "typo squatting" domains that look like the target company's domain, but are subtly different. They then set up e-mails at the typo squatted domain designed to mirror legitimate executive email accounts. Like many phishing scams, these attacks rely on the similarities of the domains and often extensive knowledge of key players within the company, creating e-mails that are highly convincing to recipients. The key element of their attack is – simply – "obeisance," Websense notes. "When the CEO or CFO tells you to do something, you do it." The messages were brief and urgent, included (phony) threads involving other company executives and demanded updates on the progress of the transfer, making the request seem more authentic. Rather than ask the executive for clarification (or scrutinize the FROM line), the employees found it easier to just wire the money to the specified account, Websense reports. Websense notes the similarities between the technique used in the latest phishing attack and the grain trading firm Scoular in June, 2014. That company was tricked into wiring some $17 million to a bank in China, with employees believing they were acting on the wishes of executives who had communicated through e-mail.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

UK IP Chief Wants ISPs To Police Piracy Proactively

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 8:07pd
An anonymous reader sends this report from TorrentFreak: The UK's top IP advisor has published recommendations on how Internet service providers should deal with online piracy. Among other things, he suggested that Internet services should search for and filter infringing content proactively. According to the report, ISPs have a moral obligation to do more against online piracy. Mike Weatherley, a Conservative MP and Intellectual Property Adviser to UK Prime Minister David Cameron, has pushed various copyright related topics onto the political agenda since early last year. Previously Weatherley suggested that search engines should blacklist pirate sites, kids should be educated on copyright ethics, and that persistent file-sharers should be thrown in jail.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

World's Largest Aircraft Seeks Investors To Begin Operation

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 7:06pd
An anonymous reader writes: The Airlander 10 is significantly larger than a 747. It's an airship that incorporates elements of blimps, planes, and hovercraft. Buoyed by a vast volume of helium, it's capable of cruising at a speed of 80 knots. It was built as a military venture, intended to be used for surveillance tasks. But as the war in Afghanistan wound down, government officials found they had no use for the airship. They ended up selling it back to the company who made it for $300,000 — after paying them $90 million to build it. Now, a small group of investors are trying to get it operational, in part to show people how safe the technology can be, and to hopefully spur construction of more airships. They say the Airlander 10 is capable of surviving a missile strike, but visions of the Hindenburg still loom large in our cultural memory.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The End of College? Not So Fast

Slashdot.org - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 6:05pd
An anonymous reader writes: The advent of MOOCs, Khan Academy, and the hundreds of other learning sites that have popped up caused many people to predict the decline of expensive, four-year universities. But Donald Heller writes in the Chronicle of Higher Education that most of the people making these claims don't have a good understanding of how actual students are interacting with online classes. He points out that it's a lot easier for a 40-year-old who's in a stable life position, and who has already experienced college-level education to work through an MOOC with ease. But things change when you're asking 18- to 20-year-olds to give up the structure and built-in motivation of a physical university to instead sit at their computer for hours at a time. (The extremely low pass rate for free online courses provides some evidence for this.) Heller also warns that prematurely hailing MOOCs as a replacement for colleges will only encourage governments and organizations to stop investing in institutions of higher learning, which could have dire consequences for education worldwide.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Benjamin Mako Hill: More Community Data Science Workshops

Planet Debian - Mër, 01/04/2015 - 4:41pd
Pictures from the CDSW sessions in Spring 2014

After two successful rounds in 2014, I’m helping put on another round of the Community Data Science Workshops. Last year, our 40+ volunteer mentorss taught more than 150 absolute beginners the basics of programming in Python, data collection from web APIs, and tools for data analysis and visualization and we’re still in the process of improving our curriculum and scaling up.

Once again, the workshops will be totally free of charge and open to anybody. Once again, they will be possible through the generous participation of a small army of volunteer mentors.

We’ll be meeting for four sessions over three weekends:

  • Setup and Programming Tutorial (April 10 evening)
  • Introduction to Programming (April 11)
  • Importing Data from web APIs (April 25)
  • Data Analysis and Visualization (May 9)

If you’re interested in attending, or interested in volunteering as mentor, you can go to the information and registration page for the current round of workshops and sign up before April 3rd.

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