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EvolvisForge blog: Tricks for using Googlemail at work

Planet Debian - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 3:54md

For these who similarily suffer from having to use Googlemail at work. If anyone else has more of these, please do share.

Deactivate the spamfilter

The site admins can do that. Otherwise, you will have work-relevant eMails, for example from your own OTRS system, end up in Spam (where you don’t see it, as their IMAP sucks) and deleted without asking 30 days later. (AIUI, the only way to get eMails actually deleted from Google…)

Do not use their SMTP service

Use your own outgoing MTA. This brings back the, well, not feature but should-have-been-granted-but-Google-doesn’t-do-it-anyway that, when you write to a mailing list, you also get your own messages into your own INBOX.

Calendars…

I have no solutions for this. I stopped using the Googlemail calendars because they didn’t think it a problem that, when I accept an invitation in Kontact (KDEPIM as packaged in Debian sid), the organiser of the calendar item in the sender’s calendar (for which I do not have write permissions) changes to me (so the actual meeting organiser cannot change anything afterwards) and/or calendar items get doubled. I now run a local uw-imapd (forward-ported to sid by means of a binNMU) for sent-mail folders etc. and a local iCalendar directory for calendars.

Morten Welinder: ODF Plus Ten Years

Planet GNOME - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 3:39md

It’s time for another five-year update on ODF for spreadsheets. Read the initial post from 2005 and the 2010 update for context. Keep in mind that I only have an opinion on ODF for spreadsheets, not text documents.

TL;DR: Better, but ODF still not suitable for spreadsheets.

So what’s new? Well, basically one thing: we now have a related standard for formulas in ODF spreadsheets! This is something that obviously occurred 5-10 years too late, but better late than never. The Wikipedia article on OpenFormula is a fairly amusing example of the need to justify and rationalize mistakes that seems to surround the OpenDocument standard.

OpenFormula isn’t bad as standards go. It has a value system, operators, and a long list of functions, for example. Nice Where it does have problems is in the many choices it allows implementations. For example, it allows a choice whether logical values are numbers or their own distinct type. That would not have been necessary if spreadsheets had been considered in the original standard — at that time OO could have bitten the bullet and aligned with everyone else.

Back to the standard proper. What has happened in the past five years? In a word, nothing. We still have a standard whose aim was to facilitate interoperability, but isn’t achieving it.

There are actually two flavours of the standard: strict and extended. “Strict” has a well-defined syntax complete with an xml schema. Extended is strict with add-your-own tags and attributes. No-one uses strict because there are common things that cannot be represented using it. Error values, for example. A simple line graph with a regression line and a legend, for example.

When the Gnumeric team needs to add something outside “strict” we first look to see if, say, LO has already defined a syntax would can use. We only invent our own when we have to and we try to read any LO extension that we can.

The OO/LO approach, however, appears to be to ignore any other producer and define a new extension. This is part of the “ODS by definition is what we write” mindset. The result is that we end up with multiple extensions for the same things.

So extensions are a free-for-all mess. In fact it is so big a mess that the schema for Gnumeric’s extensions that was hacked up a week ago appears to be the first. Let me rephrase that: for the past ten years no-one in the ODS world has been performing even basic document validation on the documents produced. There are document checkers out there, but they basically work by discarding anything non-strict and validating what is left.

There are also inherent performance problems with ODF. Many spreadsheets contain large areas of identical formulas. (“Identical” does not mean “textually identical” in ODF syntax but rather in the R1C1 syntax where “the cell to the left of this” always has the same name.) ODF has no concept of shared formulas. That forces reparsing of different strings that produce identical formulas over and over again. Tens of thousands of times is common. That is neither good for load times nor for file sizes.

A more technical problem with ODF is that the size of the sheet is not stored. One consequence is that you can have two different spreadsheets that compute completely different things but save to identical ODF files. At least one of them will be corrupted on load. That is mostly a theoretical concern, but the lack of size information also makes it harder to defend against damaged (deliberately or otherwise) input. For example, if a file says to colour cell A12345678 red we have no way of telling whether you have a damaged file or a very tall spreadsheet.

Gnumeric continues to support ODF, but we will not be making it the primary format.

Scientists Close To Solving the Mystery of Where Dogs Came From

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 3:30md
sciencehabit writes: For years researchers have argued over where and when dogs arose. Some say Europe, some say Asia. Some say 15,000 years ago, some say more than 30,000 years ago. Now an unprecedented collaboration of archaeologists and geneticists from around the world is attempting to solve the mystery once and for all. They're analyzing thousands of bones, employing new technologies, and trying to put aside years of bad blood and bruised egos. If the effort succeeds, the former competitors will uncover the history of man's oldest friend — and solve one of the greatest mysteries of domestication.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

LAUSD OKs Girls-Only STEM School, Plans Boys-Only English Language Arts School

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 2:48md
theodp writes: Citing statistics that showed a whopping 46 more boys than girls passed the AP Computer Science Exam in 2011-12, the 640,000+ student Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) on Tuesday approved a waiver to enable the District to operate a single-gender, all-girls STEM School called the Girls Academic Leadership Academy (GALA). Students in GALA will follow a six year sequence of computer courses starting in middle school that will culminate in AP Computer Science Principles. "Fewer females take AP courses in math, science, or computer science, and they are not as successful as males in receiving passing scores of 3, 4 or 5," argued the General Waiver Request (PDF, 700+ pages). "An all girls environment is reasonably necessary for the school to improve the self-confidence of girls in their academic abilities, especially in STEM areas where an achievement gap currently exists. GALA's admissions shall also comply with AB 1266 to ensure male students who identify as female are admitted to the school." The school's CS-related Partners include the UCLA Exploring Computer Science Program, as well as Google-bankrolled Girls Who Code, Black Girls Code, and NCWIT. One of the reasons the all-girls STEM school reportedly got the green light is that its backers satisfied federal regulations requiring a "substantially equal school" for excluded male students by submitting a plan for a companion all-boys school that would emphasize English Language Arts, where they often fall short of girls' test scores, rather than GALA's focus on STEM. One suspects the no-fan-of-gender-restricted-public-schools ACLU may call BS on this maneuver.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Wikileaks Publishes Hacked Sony Emails, Documents

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 2:04md
itwbennett writes Wikileaks has published a searchable database of thousands of emails and documents from Sony Pictures Entertainment that were leaked in late 2014 after the studio was attacked by hackers. Some of the 173,132 emails and 30,287 documents contain highly personal information about Sony employees including home addresses, personal phone numbers and social security numbers, a fact which is likely to raise new concerns about the use of stolen information online.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

AMD Withdraws From High-Density Server Business

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 11:27pd
An anonymous reader sends word that AMD has pulled out of the market for high-density servers. "AMD has pulled out of the market for high-density servers, reversing a strategy it embarked on three years ago with its acquisition of SeaMicro. AMD delivered the news Thursday as it announced financial results for the quarter. Its revenue slumped 26 percent from this time last year to $1.03 billion, and its net loss increased to $180 million, the company said. AMD paid $334 million to buy SeaMicro, which developed a new type of high-density server aimed at large-scale cloud and Internet service providers."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Security pros name their must-have tools

LinuxSecurity.com - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 11:15pd
LinuxSecurity.com: Secure file sharing is imperative for Lawyers Without Borders, a group that works with volunteer lawyers to advance human rights law in conflict-ridden regions. The nonprofit organization, headquartered in Hartford, Conn., uses Intralinks VIA to protect confidential legal documents and court papers from unsanctioned access.

WikiLeaks releases entire trove of Sony Hack including confidential emails

LinuxSecurity.com - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 10:51pd
LinuxSecurity.com: Wikileaks has just now released the entire trove from the Sony hack. According to a press release on WikiLeaks, the entire archive which contains 30,287 documents from Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) and 173,132 emails, to and from more than 2,200 SPE email addresses has been leaked because "This archive shows the inner workings of an influential multinational corporation.

Setting Security Professionals Up For Success

LinuxSecurity.com - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 10:49pd
LinuxSecurity.com: People, process, and technology are all integral to a successful infosec program. What's too often missing involves the concept of workflow.

UK Company Wants To Deliver Parcels Through Underground Tunnels

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 9:01pd
Zothecula writes Drones flown by Amazon aren't the only way we could be getting our parcels delivered in the near future. UK firm Mole Solutions is exploring the possibility of using small robot trains running on underground tracks to manage deliveries, and it's just received funding from the British government to help test the viability of the proposal.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Newly Discovered Sixth Extinction Rivals That of the Dinosaurs

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 6:31pd
sciencehabit writes Earth has seen its share of catastrophes, the worst being the 'big five' mass extinctions scientists traditionally talk about. Now, paleontologists are arguing that a sixth extinction, 260 million years ago, at the end of a geological age called the Capitanian, deserves to be a member of the exclusive club. In a new study, they offer evidence for a massive die-off in shallow, cool waters in what is now Norway. That finding, combined with previous evidence of extinctions in tropical waters, means that the Capitanian was a global catastrophe.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft's Role As Accuser In the Antitrust Suit Against Google

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 4:05pd
HughPickens.com writes Danny Hakim reports at the NYT that as European antitrust regulators formally accuse Google of abusing its dominance, Microsoft is relishing playing a behind-the-scenes role of scold instead of victim. Microsoft has founded or funded a cottage industry of splinter groups to go after Google. The most prominent, the Initiative for a Competitive Online Marketplace, or Icomp, has waged a relentless public relations campaign promoting grievances against Google. It conducted a study that suggested changes made by Google to appease regulators were largely window dressing. "Microsoft is doing its best to create problems for Google," says Manfred Weber, the chairman of the European People's Party, the center-right party that is the largest voting bloc in the European Parliament. "It's interesting. Ten years ago Microsoft was a big and strong company. Now they are the underdog." According to Hakim, Microsoft and Google are the Cain and Abel of American technology, locked in the kind of struggle that often takes place when a new giant threatens an older one. Microsoft was frustrated after American regulators at the Federal Trade Commission didn't act on a similar antitrust investigation against Google in 2013, calling it a "missed opportunity." It has taken the fight to the state level, along with a number of other opponents of Google. Microsoft alleges that Google's anti-competitive practices include stopping Bing from indexing content on Google-owned YouTube; blocking Microsoft Windows smartphones from "operating properly" with YouTube; blocking access to content owned by book publishers; and limiting the flow of ad campaign information back to advertisers, making it more expensive to run ads with rivals. "Over the past year, a growing number of advertisers, publishers, and consumers have expressed to us their concerns about the search market in Europe," says Brad Smith, Microsoft's general counsel. "They've urged us to share our knowledge of the search market with competition officials."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Maia Remez McCormick: Truthiness

Planet GNOME - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 3:27pd

Truthiness in Python is occasionally confusing. Obviously, False is false and True is true, but beyond that, what then?

None is always false–though this doesn’t mean that False == None, which is a mistake I made early in my Python career. I was confused by how a nonexistant list and an empty list were both falsey, and somewhere in my mind I thought that they were both None as well. Not so much.

>>> a = None >>> bool(a) False >>> b = [] >>> bool(b) False >>> bool(a is None) True >>> bool(b is None) False

A stylistic note here: since None is a singleton (i.e. there exists only one instance of it), the proper syntax is foo is None, rather than foo == None. But I digress.

The empty values of data structures are always falsey. Hence:

>>> bool([]) False >>> bool("") False >>> bool({}) False

And perhaps most confusingly:

>>> bool(0) False >>> bool(1) True >>> bool(2) True >>> bool(-31.4) True

I mean, this makes sense because we know that 0 is false and 1 is true… but if you think about it, this also means that 0 is the empty value of an int (which means that 0 is false, but every other value of int or float is true) This doesn’t mean much in Python, of course, but I’ve been playing with Go lately, in which you have to initialize your variables before you can do anything with them, and suddenly the idea of an empty value makes a lot more sense (and the empty value for an int is indeed zero).

Conversely, every non-zero value of a data structure is true. That means that a string with stuff in it, a dict. with stuff in it, a list with stuff in it, etc. is true no matter what the stuff is. And so:

>>> hip = False >>> bool(hip) False >>> bool([hip, hip]) True

Proving conclusively, as we all knew, that hips don’t lie.

(Ba-bm-psh.)

Extra credit: do you know what ["hip", "hip"] is?

…(wait for it)…

It’s a hip hip array.

(Womp womp.)

Maia Remez McCormick: Truthiness

Planet GNOME - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 3:17pd

Truthiness in Python is occasionally confusing. Obviously, False is false and True is true, but beyond that, what then?

None is always false–though this doesn’t mean that False == None, which is a mistake I made early in my Python career. I was confused by how a nonexistant list and an empty list were both falsey, and somewhere in my mind I thought that they were both None as well. Not so much.

>>> a = None >>> bool(a) False >>> b = [] >>> bool(b) False >>> bool(a is None) True >>> bool(b is None) False

A stylistic note here: since None is a singleton (i.e. there exists only one instance of it), the proper syntax is foo is None, rather than foo == None. But I digress.

The empty values of data structures are always falsey. Hence:

>>> bool([]) False >>> bool("") False >>> bool({}) False

And perhaps most confusingly:

>>> bool(0) False >>> bool(1) True >>> bool(2) True >>> bool(-31.4) True

I mean, this makes sense because we know that 0 is false and 1 is true… but if you think about it, this also means that 0 is the empty value of an int (which means that 0 is false, but every other value of int or float is true) This doesn’t mean much in Python, of course, but I’ve been playing with Go lately, in which you have to initialize your variables before you can do anything with them, and suddenly the idea of an empty value makes a lot more sense (and the empty value for an int is indeed zero).

Conversely, every non-zero value of a data structure is true. That means that a string with stuff in it, a dict. with stuff in it, a list with stuff in it, etc. is true no matter what the stuff is. And so:

>>> hip = False >>> bool(hip) False >>> bool([hip, hip]) True

Proving conclusively, as we all knew, that hips don’t lie.

Extra credit: do you know what ["hip", "hip"] is?

…(wait for it)…

It’s a hip hip array.

(Ba-bm-psh.)

Enceladus Spreads Ghostly Ice Tendrils Around Saturn

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 2:06pd
astroengine writes A ghostly apparition has long been known to follow Saturn moon Enceladus in its orbit around the gas giant. But until now, scientists have had a hard time tracking its source. Using images from NASA's Cassini mission, the source of these tendrils have been tracked down and they originate from the icy moon's famous geysers. But even better than that, scientists have been able to track the tendril shapes down to the specific geysers that produce them. "We've been able to show that each unique tendril structure can be reproduced by particular sets of geysers on the moon's surface," said Colin Mitchell, a Cassini imaging team associate at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo., and lead author of a paper published int he Astrophysical Journal. The study of these features are helping scientists understand how much ice is being transported into Saturn's E ring from Enceladus as well as helping us understand the evolution of the moon's sub-surface ocean.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Helps Homeless Street Vendors Get Paid By Cashless Consumers

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 1:18pd
An anonymous reader writes Starting today Seattle pedestrians can no longer pat their pockets and claim to have no cash when offered a copy of the ironically-named Real Change weekly newspaper by a homeless street vendor. Google has spent two years working with the Real Change organization to develop a barcode-scanning app which lets passers-by purchase a digital edition with their mobile phones. Google's Meghan Casserly believes the Real Change app — available on Android and iOs — represents the first of its kind in North America.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

GNU Hurd 0.6 Released

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 12:55pd
jrepin writes It has been roughly a year and a half since the last release of the GNU Hurd operating system, so it may be of interest to some readers that GNU Hurd 0.6 has been released along with GNU Mach 1.5 (the microkernel that Hurd runs on) and GNU MIG 1.5 (the Mach Interface Generator, which generates code to handle remote procedure calls). New features include procfs and random translators; cleanups and stylistic fixes, some of which came from static analysis; message dispatching improvements; integer hashing performance improvements; a split of the init server into a startup server and an init program based on System V init; and more.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

MIT Researchers Develop Wireless Trackpad For Your Thumbnail

Slashdot.org - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 12:35pd
itwbennett writes: Called NailO, the prototype trackpad is similar to the stick-on nails sometimes used as a fashion accessory. It attaches to the user's thumb and can be controlled by running a finger over its surface. The processor, battery, sensing chip and Bluetooth radio are included on a circuit board that sits under the capacitive trackpad. The two are connected via a small ribbon cable, which means the trackpad is not quite as thin as a stick-on nail, but reducing the size is one of the aims of the researchers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Christian Hergert: GNOME Builder - 3.16.2

Planet GNOME - Pre, 17/04/2015 - 12:24pd

Builder 3.16.2 has arrived!

I released 3.16.0 a couple weeks ago without much fanfare. Despite many months of 16-hour days and weekends, it lacked some of the features I wanted to get into the "initial" release. So I didn't stop. I kept pushing through to make 3.16.2 the best that I could.

Over the next couple of weeks I plan on writing more detailed posts on the technology. I couldn't do that while building it because I lack the ability to multitask on that level. So lets take a visual look through Builder 3.16.2. In future posts we'll dive into the various components that make up LibIDE.

Here we have the new project selector. It is shown when you start Builder. I assume long-term we'll skip this screen and jump you right back into your old project.

This is the new project dialog. Currently you can create a project from an existing one, or checkout from git. I'd like to have a workflow for quickly cloning from git.gnome.org and possibly github.

While Builder is focused on writing GNOME software (and therefore autotools), you can create a project manually by selecting a directory. Unfortunately, you wont get fancy build features in doing so. Builder is abstracted in such a way that we can add additional build systems. If you have a build system you care about, we accept most patches.

With a couple of minor patches to libgit2-glib, we got project cloning working in time. Please file bugs as you find them. We are likely to hit lots of corner cases with authentication.

Here is the editor. It looks incredibly simple, and that took a lot of work. One thing I'm particularly proud of is how it feels like a single widget rather than being composted of lots of little ones. Relentless iteration was key here.

This contains Builder's custom style scheme for GtkSourceView. Also notice the grid background. That work got pushed upstream into GtkSourceView this cycle.

If you take a look at the macros, you'll notice that macro names and expansions are highlighed. Also, type names are highlighted. This all comes from the parsing the file with clang and extracting information from the resulting AST.

You can quickly switch buffers in the view stack. ls and buffers commands in the command bar will focus this (more on that later).

If you are using autotools with C or C++, we can do a reasonable job of extracting CFLAGS to provide to clang. I went through painstaking effort to make that fast.

We provide you a drop down of symbols that we discovered in the file. Clicking on one will focus it in the editor.

You can switch between header and source quickly with F4.

While we try to do the right thing with syntax formatting, sometimes we get it wrong. You can override the discovered settings with the editor tweak dropdown.

Note that we support editorconfig and modelines today. We also provide some gsettings to set defaults across all your projects on a per-language basis.

Clicking on the document title will give you options related to that document. This includes splits, preview, and save operations. More on preview later.

Splits are pretty universally required out of an editor these days. Builder was designed with that in mind.

Notice the highlighting on enums and function names below. Yeah, we do that too.

Yup, we have a project tree. The venerable F9 toggles it's visibility.

I rather like the new designs for creating new files. So I borrowed them for the project tree.

We try to be smart and expand the selected item while you are creating to give you all the context we can.

You can even do a few things with what is in the tree. Clearly this is early on, we have lots more to do. No DnD support yet, sorry!

File rename. I prefer the popover design to editing in place with GtkCellRendererText. I know it's not much context, but it's something.

Honestly, I haven't spent that much time on preferences. But we do have some. I'd love for someone to come own this feature in Builder.

We have a few flavors of keybindings. I prefer Vim.

Late in the cycle, Alexander Larsson had an idea to do keybindings using the new "gtk-key-bindings" CSS property. It was no walk in the park, but it does work. Our Vim is implemented in CSS.

I often get asked why not just use NeoVim. I have a few reasons. First, I don't want to maintain 2 editors. And then 3 because people will want emacs too. Additionally, anything that resembles the real vim codebase I'm not touching with a 10ft pole. Third, I want all the features we put into a particular mode to improve the other modes equally. It wont ever be perfect, but it's certainly functional.

If you think you can manage to merge GtkTextView<->NeoVim, please go do that prototype somewhere and then we can definitely look at using it. But wholesale using another widget is out of the question. I'm not absracting "IBreakpoint" 4 times for 3 implementations and an interface. That's insane.

Type to search in preferences works.

Diagnostics that support Fix-Its can be applied directly from the editor.

Global search is handy for opening files. I certinaly don't use the project tree to open files. This is way faster.

You can also search for documentation.

I do expect this feature to iterate a lot in the future. We have lots of designs to work through.

One thing I never liked about Vim was that Shift+K would take you out of Vim to read the manpage. We can just show you the documentation side-by-side.

I still consider this a crutch though, we should really be providing good documentation at your fingertips when you need it (such as during autocompletion).

We have live preview for markdown.

I think we need a new markdown parser that lets us inject the cursor position. Right now we don't have a way to keep the editor and preview lines matched up vertically.

Works well for small files though.

You have no idea what it took to generate yellow squigly lines with GtkTextView. I had to hide data in the semi-public, albeit out-of-space GtkTextAppearance structure. I ended up stealing a few bytes here and there in the unusable padding between structures.

Errors are easy of course (just set PANGO_UNDERLINE_ERROR). But both that and and setting color is one of those 10+ year bugs. Clearly we should be less crazy in 4.0.

Additions and changes are rendered in the gutter to the left based on colors defined in your style scheme.

We have a dark mode!

You can enable and disable it with nighthack and dayhack in the command bar. Let this be an example of how bad I am at naming things.

Also, we have a command bar! You can execute various GActions in the widget hierarchy as well as some vim commands.

The command bar also has autocompletion.

For the truely adventurous of you, you can enable the experimental clang autocompletion. It crashes a lot. I don't even run it. You are crazy, don't do it!

It does build upon our snippet engine to when you perform the completion. That means you can tab through the various parameters and we put dummy text in place to give you some context. Context is paramount.

The snippet engine is pretty powerful. You can have tab-stops, linked edit points, edit points which transform values from other edit points, or none at all.

Also, they come with superfluous animation.

So many of the details in Builder aren't visible. So I'm glossing over half the work that went into this release. I'll be expanding more on that in the future, in posts that are not quite so screenshot heavy.

Happy Hacking!

An Engineering Analysis of the Falcon 9 First Stage Landing Failure

Slashdot.org - Enj, 16/04/2015 - 11:53md
schwit1 writes: AviationWeek has posted an analysis of SpaceX's latest attempt to land its Falcon 9 rocket on an ocean barge. Quoting: "SpaceX founder and chief technology officer Elon Musk tweeted that "excess lateral velocity caused it [the booster] to tip over post landing." In a later tweet that was subsequently withdrawn, Musk then indicated that "the issue was stiction in the biprop throttle valve, resulting in control system phase lag." In this statement, Musk was referring to "stiction" — or static friction — in the valve controlling the throttling of the engine. The friction appears to have momentarily slowed the response of the engine, causing the control system to command more of an extreme reaction from the propulsion system than was required. As a result, the control system entered a form of hysteresis, a condition in which the control response lags behind changes in the effect causing it. Despite the failure of the latest attempt, SpaceX will be encouraged by the landing accuracy of the Falcon 9 and the bigger-picture success of its guidance, navigation and control (GNC) system in bringing the booster back to the drone ship. The GNC also worked as designed during the prior landing attempt in January, which ended in the destruction of the vehicle following a hard touchdown on the edge of the platform." In related news, SpaceX is hoping to attempt its next landing on solid ground.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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