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Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

Slashdot.org - 19 orë 45 min më parë
storagedude writes: With LTO media sales down by 50% in the last six years, is the end near for tape? With such a large installed base, it may not be imminent, but the time is coming when vendors will find it increasingly difficult to justify continued investment in tape technology, writes Henry Newman at Enterprise Storage Forum. "If multiple vendors invest in a technology, it has a good chance of winning over the long haul," writes Newman, a long-time proponent of tape technology. "If multiple vendors have a technology they're not investing in, it will eventually lose over time. Of course, over time market requirements can change. It is these interactions that I fear that are playing out in the tape market."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The People Who Are Branding Vulnerabilities

Slashdot.org - 20 orë 27 min më parë
antdude points out a story at ZDNet about how the naming of security vulnerabilities and exploits has evolved into branding and awareness campaigns. Heartbleed set the trend early this year, having a distinct name and logo to represent a serious security problem. It seemed to work; the underlying bug got massive exposure, even in the mainstream media. This raises a new set of issues — should the response to the disclosure of a vulnerability be dependent on how catchy its name is? No, but it probably will be. Heartbleed charmed the public, and in a way, it was designed to do so. By comparison Shellshock, POODLE (aka clumsy "Poodlebleed"), Sandworm, the secretively named Rootpipe, Winshock, and other vulns seem like proverbial "red headed stepchildren" — despite the fact that each of these vulns are critical issues, some are worse than Heartbleed, and all of which needed fast responses. The next "big bug" after Heartbleed was Shellshock — real name CVE-2014-6271. Shellshock didn't have a company's pocketbook or marketing team behind it. So, despite the fact that many said Shellshock was worse than Heartbleed (rated high on severity but low on complexity, making it easy for attackers), creating a celebrity out of Shellshock faced an uphill climb.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Randall Ross: POWER Up!

Planet UBUNTU - 21 orë 6 min më parë

A while back, as part of my new role, I began looking for opportunities to:

  1. Challenge the status quo, and,
  2. Connect people together that want to solve big problems.

(Luckily, the two are closely related.)

Recently, I was introduced to some fine folks at SiteOx in Franklin, TN (that's just outside of Memphis) that happen to have some really fast POWER8 systems that provide infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS).

I mentioned that previously unknown tidbit to some of my colleagues (who are are awesome Juju Charmers) to see if/how the service could be used to speed Juju Charm development.

As it turns out, it can! In case you missed it, Matt Bruzek of Juju Charmer fame, figured it all out and then wrote a concise guide to do just that. Check it out here, and then...

Click the button to feel the POWER!

Thanks Matt, and thanks SiteOx.

Stephen Michael Kellat: Pondering Contingencies

Planet UBUNTU - 21 orë 9 min më parë

Preparedness is an odd topic. As people in the United States might have recalled from last week, snow abounded in certain parts of the country. Although not located in the New York State community of Buffalo, I am located down the Lake Erie shoreline in Ashtabula. I too am seasonally afflicted with Lake Effect Snow Storms.

Heck, I have even seen Thunder Snow!

Following the major snow, I got to see "High Wind Warning". That was not fun as it did lead to a blackout. The various UPS units around the house started screaming. Once that happened I had multiple systems to shut down. The Xubuntu meeting log this week even shows me shutting down things while departing mid-way. As you might imagine, overhead electrical lines do not play nicely with 50 mile per hour wind gusts.

When using a computer, you never truly have an ideal environment for the bare metal to operate in. Although contemporary life leaves the impression that electricity and broadband service should be constant let alone stable, bad things do happen. I already have multiple UPS units scattered around as it is.

Donald Rumsfeld, the former US Secretary of Defense, had a saying that fits:

As you know, you go to war with the army you have, not the army you might want or wish to have at a later time.

I live in what is termed by our census officials a "Micropolitan Statistical Area" compared to a "Metropolitan Statistical Area" so I know it is small. I know our infrastructure is not the greatest. Planning ahead means being ready to be without electricity for an extended period of time here.

While the Buffalo Bills football team had to move their home game to Detroit due to their stadium filling with snow, imagine the flooding aftermath that may happen when that snow melts. Extreme cases like that are hard to plan for but at least the game is going to happen somewhere. What contingencies have you at least thought about working around?

Firefox Will Soon Offer One-Click Buttons For Your Search Engines

Slashdot.org - 21 orë 15 min më parë
An anonymous reader writes: Mozilla today unveiled some of the new search features coming to Firefox. The company says the new additions are "coming soon to a Firefox near you" but didn't give a more specific timeline. The news comes less than a week after Mozilla struck a deal with Yahoo to replace Google as the default search engine in its browser for U.S. users. At the time, the company said a new search experience was coming in December, so we're betting the search revamp will come with the release of Firefox 34, which is currently in beta. In the future release, when you type a search term into the Firefox search box, you will get a list of reorganized search suggestions from the default search provider. Better yet, a new array of buttons below these suggestions will let you pick which search engine you want to send the query to.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How the World's First Computer Was Rescued From the Scrap Heap

Slashdot.org - 21 orë 55 min më parë
anavictoriasaavedra sends this quote from Wired: "Eccentric billionaires are tough to impress, so their minions must always think big when handed vague assignments. Ross Perot's staffers did just that in 2006, when their boss declared that he wanted to decorate his Plano, Texas, headquarters with relics from computing history. Aware that a few measly Apple I's and Altair 880's wouldn't be enough to satisfy a former presidential candidate, Perot's people decided to acquire a more singular prize: a big chunk of ENIAC, the "Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer." The ENIAC was a 27-ton, 1,800-square-foot bundle of vacuum tubes and diodes that was arguably the world's first true computer. The hardware that Perot's team diligently unearthed and lovingly refurbished is now accessible to the general public for the first time, back at the same Army base where it almost rotted into oblivion.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Samsung Shows 'Eye Mouse' For People With Disabilities

Slashdot.org - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 11:31md
Samsung today announced a project among a group of its engineers to build an input device that allows people with limited mobility to operate a computer through eye movement alone. The EYECAN+ is a rectangular box that needs to be situated roughly 60-70cm away from a user's face. Once calibrated, it will superimpose a multifunction UI and track a user's eye movements to move the cursor where they want. Samsung says they won't be commercializing this device, but they'll soon be making the design open source for any company or organization who wants to start building them.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Sune Vuorela: QImage and QPixmap in a Qt Quick item

Planet Debian - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 10:50md

For reasons I don’t know, apparantly a Qt Quick Item that can show a QImage or a QPixmap is kind of missing. The current Image QML item only works with data that can be represented by a URL.

So I wrote one that kind of works. Comments most welcome.

It is found on git.kde.org: http://quickgit.kde.org/?p=scratch/sune/imageitem.git

Oh, and the KDE End of Year fundraiser is still running. https://www.kde.org/fundraisers/yearend2014/. Go support it if you haven’t already.

Holger Levsen: 20141125-change

Planet Debian - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 10:48md
Change

Not many people adapt to fundamental changes easily, but at least people can change at all. I'm sure what looks funny now has also been a painful experience, but... - that's life. Sometimes it sucks. And suddenly...

About 40% of World Population Online, 90% of Offliners In Developing Countries

Slashdot.org - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 10:45md
New submitter lx76 writes: The International Telecommunications Union does research on telecommunications in society worldwide, from cellphones to internet use. Since 2009, on a yearly basis, they've released their research findings in a report called the Measuring Information Society Report. This year's report is over 200 pages long, illustrated with abundant graphs and tables (PDF). It's not a light read. But one of the interesting numbers is an index showing the divide in global connectivity. From the report: "Over the past year, the world witnessed continued growth in the uptake of ICT [Information and Communication Technology] and, by end 2014, almost 3 billion people will be using the Internet, up from 2.7 billion at end 2013..... Despite this encouraging progress, there are important digital divides that need to be addressed: 4.3 billion people are still not online, and 90 per cent of them live in the developing world." The report continues, "As this report finds, ICT performance is better in countries with higher shares of the population living in urban areas, where access to ICT infrastructure, usage and skills is more favorable. Yet it is precisely in poor and rural areas where ICTs can make a particularly significant impact." Projects like Google's Project Loon have their work cut out for them."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Eric Hammond: AWS Lambda Walkthrough Command Line Companion

Planet UBUNTU - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 10:36md

The AWS Lambda Walkthrough 2 uses AWS Lambda to automatically resize images added to one bucket, placing the resulting thumbnails in another bucket. The walkthrough documentation has a mix of aws-cli commands, instructions for hand editing files, and steps requiring the AWS console.

For my personal testing, I converted all of these to command line instructions that can simply be copied and pasted, making them more suitable for adapting into scripts and for eventual automation. I share the results here in case others might find this a faster way to get started with Lambda.

These instructions assume that you have already set up and are using an IAM user / aws-cli profile with admin credentials.

The following is intended as a companion to the Amazon walkthrough documentation, simplifying the execution steps for command line lovers. Read the AWS documentation itself for more details explaining the walkthrough.

Set up

Set up environment variables describing the associated resources:

# Change to your own unique S3 bucket name: source_bucket=alestic-lambda-example # Do not change this. Walkthrough code assumes this name target_bucket=${source_bucket}resized function=CreateThumbnail lambda_execution_role_name=lambda-$function-execution lambda_execution_access_policy_name=lambda-$function-execution-access lambda_invocation_role_name=lambda-$function-invocation lambda_invocation_access_policy_name=lambda-$function-invocation-access log_group_name=/aws/lambda/$function

Install some required software:

sudo apt-get install nodejs nodejs-legacy npm Step 1.1: Create Buckets and Upload a Sample Object (walkthrough)

Create the buckets:

aws s3 mb s3://$source_bucket aws s3 mb s3://$target_bucket

Upload a sample photo:

# by Hatalmas: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hatalmas/6094281702 wget -q -OHappyFace.jpg \ https://c3.staticflickr.com/7/6209/6094281702_d4ac7290d3_b.jpg aws s3 cp HappyFace.jpg s3://$source_bucket/ Step 2.1: Create a Lambda Function Deployment Package (walkthrough)

Create the Lambda function nodejs code:

# JavaScript code as listed in walkthrough wget -q -O $function.js \ http://run.alestic.com/lambda/aws-examples/CreateThumbnail.js

Install packages needed by the Lambda function code. Note that this is done under the local directory:

npm install async gm # aws-sdk is not needed

Put all of the required code into a ZIP file, ready for uploading:

zip -r $function.zip $function.js node_modules Step 2.2: Create an IAM Role for AWS Lambda (walkthrough)

IAM role that will be used by the Lambda function when it runs.

lambda_execution_role_arn=$(aws iam create-role \ --role-name "$lambda_execution_role_name" \ --assume-role-policy-document '{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "", "Effect": "Allow", "Principal": { "Service": "lambda.amazonaws.com" }, "Action": "sts:AssumeRole" } ] }' \ --output text \ --query 'Role.Arn' ) echo lambda_execution_role_arn=$lambda_execution_role_arn

What the Lambda function is allowed to do/access. This is slightly tighter than the generic role policy created with the IAM console:

aws iam put-role-policy \ --role-name "$lambda_execution_role_name" \ --policy-name "$lambda_execution_access_policy_name" \ --policy-document '{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Effect": "Allow", "Action": [ "logs:*" ], "Resource": "arn:aws:logs:*:*:*" }, { "Effect": "Allow", "Action": [ "s3:GetObject" ], "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::'$source_bucket'/*" }, { "Effect": "Allow", "Action": [ "s3:PutObject" ], "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::'$target_bucket'/*" } ] }' Step 2.3: Upload the Deployment Package and Invoke it Manually (walkthrough)

Upload the Lambda function, specifying the IAM role it should use and other attributes:

# Timeout increased from walkthrough based on experience aws lambda upload-function \ --function-name "$function" \ --function-zip "$function.zip" \ --role "$lambda_execution_role_arn" \ --mode event \ --handler "$function.handler" \ --timeout 30 \ --runtime nodejs

Create fake S3 event data to pass to the Lambda function. The key here is the source S3 bucket and key:

cat > $function-data.json <<EOM { "Records":[ { "eventVersion":"2.0", "eventSource":"aws:s3", "awsRegion":"us-east-1", "eventTime":"1970-01-01T00:00:00.000Z", "eventName":"ObjectCreated:Put", "userIdentity":{ "principalId":"AIDAJDPLRKLG7UEXAMPLE" }, "requestParameters":{ "sourceIPAddress":"127.0.0.1" }, "responseElements":{ "x-amz-request-id":"C3D13FE58DE4C810", "x-amz-id-2":"FMyUVURIY8/IgAtTv8xRjskZQpcIZ9KG4V5Wp6S7S/JRWeUWerMUE5JgHvANOjpD" }, "s3":{ "s3SchemaVersion":"1.0", "configurationId":"testConfigRule", "bucket":{ "name":"$source_bucket", "ownerIdentity":{ "principalId":"A3NL1KOZZKExample" }, "arn":"arn:aws:s3:::$source_bucket" }, "object":{ "key":"HappyFace.jpg", "size":1024, "eTag":"d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e", "versionId":"096fKKXTRTtl3on89fVO.nfljtsv6qko" } } } ] } EOM

Invoke the Lambda function, passing in the fake S3 event data:

aws lambda invoke-async \ --function-name "$function" \ --invoke-args "$function-data.json"

Look in the target bucket for the converted image. It could take a while to show up since the Lambda function is running asynchronously:

aws s3 ls s3://$target_bucket

Look at the Lambda function log output in CloudWatch:

aws logs describe-log-groups \ --output text \ --query 'logGroups[*].[logGroupName]' log_stream_names=$(aws logs describe-log-streams \ --log-group-name "$log_group_name" \ --output text \ --query 'logStreams[*].logStreamName') echo log_stream_names="'$log_stream_names'" for log_stream_name in $log_stream_names; do aws logs get-log-events \ --log-group-name "$log_group_name" \ --log-stream-name "$log_stream_name" \ --output text \ --query 'events[*].message' done | less Step 3.1: Create an IAM Role for Amazon S3 (walkthrough)

This role may be assumed by S3.

lambda_invocation_role_arn=$(aws iam create-role \ --role-name "$lambda_invocation_role_name" \ --assume-role-policy-document '{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "", "Effect": "Allow", "Principal": { "Service": "s3.amazonaws.com" }, "Action": "sts:AssumeRole", "Condition": { "StringLike": { "sts:ExternalId": "arn:aws:s3:::*" } } } ] }' \ --output text \ --query 'Role.Arn' ) echo lambda_invocation_role_arn=$lambda_invocation_role_arn

S3 may invoke the Lambda function.

aws iam put-role-policy \ --role-name "$lambda_invocation_role_name" \ --policy-name "$lambda_invocation_access_policy_name" \ --policy-document '{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Effect": "Allow", "Action": [ "lambda:InvokeFunction" ], "Resource": [ "*" ] } ] }' Step 3.2: Configure a Notification on the Bucket (walkthrough)

Get the Lambda function ARN:

lambda_function_arn=$(aws lambda get-function-configuration \ --function-name "$function" \ --output text \ --query 'FunctionARN' ) echo lambda_function_arn=$lambda_function_arn

Tell the S3 bucket to invoke the Lambda function when new objects are created (or overwritten):

aws s3api put-bucket-notification \ --bucket "$source_bucket" \ --notification-configuration '{ "CloudFunctionConfiguration": { "CloudFunction": "'$lambda_function_arn'", "InvocationRole": "'$lambda_invocation_role_arn'", "Event": "s3:ObjectCreated:*" } }' Step 3.3: Test the Setup (walkthrough)

Copy your own jpg and png files into the source bucket:

myimages=... aws s3 cp $myimages s3://$source_bucket/

Look for the resized images in the target bucket:

aws s3 ls s3://$target_bucket Check out the environment

These handy commands let you review the related resources in your acccount:

aws lambda list-functions \ --output text \ --query 'Functions[*].[FunctionName]' aws lambda get-function \ --function-name "$function" aws iam list-roles \ --output text \ --query 'Roles[*].[RoleName]' aws iam get-role \ --role-name "$lambda_execution_role_name" \ --output json \ --query 'Role.AssumeRolePolicyDocument.Statement' aws iam list-role-policies \ --role-name "$lambda_execution_role_name" \ --output text \ --query 'PolicyNames[*]' aws iam get-role-policy \ --role-name "$lambda_execution_role_name" \ --policy-name "$lambda_execution_access_policy_name" \ --output json \ --query 'PolicyDocument' aws iam get-role \ --role-name "$lambda_invocation_role_name" \ --output json \ --query 'Role.AssumeRolePolicyDocument.Statement' aws iam list-role-policies \ --role-name "$lambda_invocation_role_name" \ --output text \ --query 'PolicyNames[*]' aws iam get-role-policy \ --role-name "$lambda_invocation_role_name" \ --policy-name "$lambda_invocation_access_policy_name" \ --output json \ --query 'PolicyDocument' aws s3api get-bucket-notification \ --bucket "$source_bucket" Clean up

If you are done with the walkthrough, you can delete the created resources:

aws s3 rm s3://$target_bucket/resized-HappyFace.jpg aws s3 rm s3://$source_bucket/HappyFace.jpg aws s3 rb s3://$target_bucket/ aws s3 rb s3://$source_bucket/ aws lambda delete-function \ --function-name "$function" aws iam delete-role-policy \ --role-name "$lambda_execution_role_name" \ --policy-name "$lambda_execution_access_policy_name" aws iam delete-role \ --role-name "$lambda_execution_role_name" aws iam delete-role-policy \ --role-name "$lambda_invocation_role_name" \ --policy-name "$lambda_invocation_access_policy_name" aws iam delete-role \ --role-name "$lambda_invocation_role_name" log_stream_names=$(aws logs describe-log-streams \ --log-group-name "$log_group_name" \ --output text \ --query 'logStreams[*].logStreamName') && for log_stream_name in $log_stream_names; do echo "deleting log-stream $log_stream_name" aws logs delete-log-stream \ --log-group-name "$log_group_name" \ --log-stream-name "$log_stream_name" done aws logs delete-log-group \ --log-group-name "$log_group_name"

If you try these instructions, please let me know in the comments where you had trouble or experienced errors.

Original article: http://alestic.com/2014/11/aws-lambda-cli

How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

Slashdot.org - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 10:01md
itwbennett writes: For too long, it looked like SSD capacity would always lag well behind hard disk drives, which were pushing into the 6TB and 8TB territory while SSDs were primarily 256GB to 512GB. That seems to be ending. In September, Samsung announced a 3.2TB SSD drive. And during an investor webcast last week, Intel announced it will begin offering 3D NAND drives in the second half of next year as part of its joint flash venture with Micron. Meanwhile, hard drive technology has hit the wall in many ways. They can't really spin the drives faster than 7,200 RPM without increasing heat and the rate of failure. All hard drives have now is the capacity argument; speed is all gone. Oh, and price. We'll have to wait and see on that.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








A Toolbox That Helps Keep You From Losing Tools (Video)

Slashdot.org - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 9:15md
Dan Mcculley, the interviewee in this video, works for Intel and claims they have "about 140" projects going on inside their fabs and factories, of which the Smart Toolbox is but one, and it's one some technicians came up with because Intel workers lose something like $35,000 worth of tools every year. This project is based on the same Galileo boards Intel has used to support some high-altitude balloon launches -- except this is an extremely simple, practical application. Open source? You bet! And Dan says the sensors and other parts are all off-the-shelf items anyone can buy. (Alternate Video Link)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








NASA To Deploy Four Spacecraft To Study Magnetic Reconnection

Slashdot.org - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 8:37md
Zothecula writes: NASA has released a video depicting the initial deployment of an undertaking designed to study a phenomenon known as magnetic reconnection. "Reconnection happens when magnetic field lines explosively realign and release massive bursts of energy, while hurling particles out at nearly the speed of light in all directions. Magnetic reconnection powers eruptions on the sun and – closer to home – it triggers the flow of material and energy from interplanetary space into near-Earth space." The launch of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission will see four identical spacecraft deployed from a single Atlas V rocket, set to lift off from cape Canaveral, Florida, no earlier than March next year.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Chris Wayne: Galileo updated in PPA

Planet UBUNTU - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 8:01md

Sorry I had neglected this for a bit, but the latest version of Galileo is now available in my PPA.  It has also been uploaded for 12.04, 14.04, 14.10, and vivid (15.04).  Please test and if you find any issues, shoot me an email at mailto:cwayne@ubuntu.com

The Schizophrenic Programmer Who Built an OS To Talk To God

Slashdot.org - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 7:54md
rossgneumann writes: Terry Davis, a schizophrenic programmer, has spent 10 years building an operating system to talk to God. He's done this work because God told him to. According to the TempleOS charter, it is "God's official temple. Just like Solomon's temple, this is a community focal point where offerings are made and God's oracle is consulted." [The TempleOS V2.17 welcome screen] greets the user with a riot of 16-color, scrolling, blinking text; depending on your frame of reference, it might recall DESQview, the Commodore 64, or a host of early DOS-based graphical user interfaces. In style if not in specifics, it evokes a particular era, a time when the then-new concept of "personal computing" necessarily meant programming and tinkering and breaking things.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Michael Hall: Ubuntu Incubator

Planet UBUNTU - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 7:47md

The Ubuntu Core Apps project has proven that the Ubuntu community is not only capable of building fantastic software, but they’re capable of the meeting the same standards, deadlines and requirements that are expected from projects developed by employees. One of the things that I think made Core Apps so successful was the project management support that they all received from Alan Pope.

Project management is common, even expected, for software developed commercially, but it’s just as often missing from community projects. It’s time to change that. I’m kicking off a new personal[1] project, I’m calling it the Ubuntu Incubator.

The purpose of the Incubator is to help community projects bootstrap themselves, obtain the resources they need to run their project, and put together a solid plan that will set them on a successful, sustainable path.

To that end I’m going to devote one month to a single project at a time. I will meet with the project members regularly (weekly or every-other week), help define a scope for their project, create a spec, define work items and assign them to milestones. I will help them get resources from other parts of the community and Canonical when they need them, promote their work and assist in recruiting contributors. All of the important things that a project needs, other than direct contributions to the final product.

I’m intentionally keeping the scope of my involvement very focused and brief. I don’t want to take over anybody’s project or be a co-founder. I will take on only one project at a time, so that project gets all of my attention during their incubation period. The incubation period itself is very short, just one month, so that I will focus on getting them setup, not on running them.  Once I finish with one project, I will move on to the next[2].

How will I choose which project to incubate? Since it’s my time, it’ll be my choice, but the most important factor will be whether or not a project is ready to be incubated. “Ready” means they are more than just an idea: they are both possible to accomplish and feasible to accomplish with the person or people already involved, the implementation details have been mostly figured out, and they just need help getting the ball rolling. “Ready” also means it’s not an existing project looking for a boost, while we need to support those projects too, that’s not what the Incubator is for.

So, if you have a project that’s ready to go, but you need a little help taking that first step, you can let me know by adding your project’s information to this etherpad doc[3]. I’ll review each one and let you know if I think it’s ready, needs to be defined a little bit more, or not a good candidate. Then each month I’ll pick one and reach out to them to get started.

Now, this part is important: don’t wait for me! I want to speed up community innovation, not slow it down, so even if I add your project to the “Ready” queue, keep on doing what you would do otherwise, because I have no idea when (or if) I will be able to get to yours. Also, if there are any other community leaders with project management experience who have the time and desire to help incubate one of these project, go ahead and claim it and reach out to that team.

[1] While this compliments my regular job, it’s not something I’ve been asked to do by Canonical, and to be honest I have enough Canonical-defined tasks to consume my working hours. This is me with just my community hat on, and I’m inclined to keep it that way.

[2] I’m not going to forget about projects after their month is up, but you get 100% of the time I spend on incubation during your month, after that my time will be devoted to somebody else.

[3] I’m using Etherpad to keep the process as lightweight as possible, if we need something better in the future we’ll adopt it then.

Revisiting Open Source Social Networking Alternatives

Slashdot.org - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 7:09md
reifman writes Upstart social networking startup Ello burst on the scene in September with promises of a utopian, post-Facebook platform that respected user's privacy. I was surprised to see so many public figures and media entities jump on board — mainly because of what Ello isn't. It isn't an open source, decentralized social networking technology. It's just another privately held, VC-funded silo. Remember Diaspora? In 2010, it raised $200,641 on Kickstarter to take on Facebook with "an open source personal web server to share all your stuff online." Two years later, they essentially gave up, leaving their code to the open source community to carry forward. In part one of "Revisiting Open Source Social Networking Alternatives," I revisit/review six open source social networking alternatives in search of a path forward beyond Facebook.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ubuntu Server blog: Server team meeting minutes: 2014-11-25

Planet UBUNTU - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 6:55md
Agenda
  • Review ACTION points from previous meeting
    • None
  • V Development
  • Server & Cloud Bugs (caribou)
  • Weekly Updates & Questions for the QA Team (psivaa)
  • Weekly Updates & Questions for the Kernel Team (smb, sforshee, arges)
  • Ubuntu Server Team Events
  • Open Discussion
  • Announce next meeting date, time and chair
Minutes Meeting Actions
  • matsubara to chase someone that can update release bugs report: http://reqorts.qa.ubuntu.com/reports/rls-mgr/rls-v-tracking-bug-tasks.html#ubuntu-server
Weekly Updates & Questions for the Kernel Team (smb, sforshee, arges)
  • smb reports: “I did a few stable uploads for Xen in Utopic and Trusty. Though zul, you may want to hold back doing cloud-archive versions. There is more to come. Also from some email report on xen-devel there are a few things missing to make openstack and xen a better experience (bug #1396068 and bug #1394327 at least). I am working on getting things applied and SRUed.”
Agree on next meeting date and time

Next meeting will be on Tuesday, Dec 2nd at 16:00 UTC in #ubuntu-meeting. kickinz1 will chair.

IRC Log http://ubottu.com/meetingology/logs/ubuntu-meeting/2014/ubuntu-meeting.2014-11-25-16.01.html

Top Counter-Strike Players Embroiled In Hacking Scandal

Slashdot.org - Mar, 25/11/2014 - 6:30md
An anonymous reader writes Counter-Strike: Global Offensive is one of the world's fastest growing eSports, but the community has been rocked by scandal in the last week, with several top players being banned by Valve for using various hacking tools to improve their performance. With the huge Dreamhack Winter tournament taking place this weekend, the purge could not have come at a worse time for the game, and fans are now poring over the archives for other signs of foul play in top tier games — be sure to look out for these tell tale signs while playing.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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