You are here

Site në gjuhë të huaj

Experimental Drug Stops Ebola-like Infection

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 6:47md
sciencehabit writes: An experimental treatment against an Ebola-related virus can protect monkeys even when given up to 3 days after infection, the point at which they show the first signs of disease. The virus, known as Marburg, causes severe hemorrhagic fever—vomiting, diarrhea, and internal bleeding. In one outbreak, it killed 90% of people it infected. There are no proven treatments or vaccines against it. The new results raise hopes that the treatment might be useful for human patients even if they don't receive it until well after infection. The company that makes the compound, Tekmira, based in Burnaby, Canada, has started a human safety trial of a related drug to treat Ebola virus disease, and researchers hope that it, too, might offer protection even after a patient has started to feel ill. In other Ebola news, the two American aid workers who were infected with the virus while in Liberia have now recovered and been released from the hospital.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dramatic Shifts In Manufacturing Costs Are Driving Companies To US, Mexico

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 6:14md
hackingbear writes: According to a new Cost-Competitiveness Index, the nations often perceived as having low manufacturing costs — such as China, Brazil, Russia, and the Czech Republic — are no longer much cheaper than the U.S. In some cases, they are estimated to be even more expensive. Chinese manufacturing wages have nearly quintupled since 2004, while Mexican wages have risen by less than 50 percent in U.S. dollar terms, contrary to our long-standing misconception that their labors were being slaved. In the same period, the U.S. wage is essentially flat, whereas Mexican wages have risen only 67%. Not all countries are taking full advantage of their low-cost advantages, however. The report found that global competiveness in manufacturing is undermined in nations such as India and Indonesia by several factors, including logistics, the overall ease of doing business, and inflexible labor markets.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Interviews: Andrew "bunnie" Huang Answers Your Questions

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 5:32md
A while ago you had a chance to ask Andrew "bunnie" Huang about hardware, hacking and his open source hardware laptop Novena. Below you'll find his answers to those questions.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Couchsurfing Hacked, Sends Airbnb Prank Spam

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 4:50md
Slashdot regular (and Couchsurfing.org volunteer) Bennett Haselton writes with a report that an anonymous prankster hacked the Couchsurfing.org website and sent spam to about 1 million members, snarkily advertising their commercial arch-rival Airbnb as "the new Couchsurfing." (Read on below for more on the breach.) As of now, the spam's been caught, but not the spammer.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The 2014 Hugo Awards

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 4:09md
Dave Knott writes: WorldCon 2014 wrapped up in London this last weekend and this year's Hugo Award winners were announced. Notable award winners include: Best Novel: Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie Best Novelette: "The Lady Astronaut of Mars" by Mary Robinette Kowal Best Novella: "Equoid" by Charles Stross Best Short Story: "The Water That Falls on You from Nowhere" by John Chu Best Graphic Story: "Time" by Randall Munroe Best Dramatic Presentation (Long Form): Gravity written by Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón, directed by Alfonso Cuarón Best Dramatic Presentation (Short Form): Game of Thrones: "The Rains of Castamere" written by David Benioff & D.B. Weiss, directed by David Nutter The results of this year's awards were awaited with some some trepidation in the SF community, due to well-documented attempts by some controversial authors to game the voting system. These tactics appear to have been largely unsuccessful, as this is the fourth major award for the Leckie novel, which had already won the 2013 BSFA, 2013 Nebula and 2014 Clarke awards.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Study: Ad-Free Internet Would Cost Everyone $230-a-Year

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 3:27md
Several readers sent word of research into the cost of internet content without ads. They looked at the amount of money spent on internet advertising last year in the U.K., and compared it to the number of U.K. internet users. On average, each user would have to pay about £140 ($230) to make up for the lost revenue of an ad-free internet. In a survey, 98% of consumers said they wouldn't be willing to pay that much for the ability to browse without advertisements. However, while most consumers regard ads as a necessary trade-off to keep the internet free, they will go to great lengths to avoid advertising they do not wish to see. Of those surveyed, 63 per cent said they skip online video ads 'as quickly as possible' – a figure that rises to 75 per cent for 16-24 year olds. Over a quarter of all respondents said they mute their sound and one in five scroll away from the video. 16 per cent use ad blocking software and 16 per cent open a new browser window or tab.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Michael Hall: Communicating Recognition

Planet UBUNTU - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 3:00md

Recognition is like money, it only really has value when it’s being passed between one person and another. Otherwise it’s just potential value, sitting idle.  Communication gives life to recognition, turning it’s potential value into real value.

As I covered in my previous post, Who do you contribute to?, recognition doesn’t have a constant value.  In that article I illustrated how the value of recognition differs depending on who it’s coming from, but that’s not the whole story.  The value of recognition also differs depending on the medium of communication.

Over at the Community Leadership Knowledge Base I started documenting different forms of communication that a community might choose, and how each medium has a balance of three basic properties: Speed, Thoughtfulness and Discoverability. Let’s call this the communication triangle. Each of these also plays a part in the value of recognition.

Speed

Again, much like money, recognition is something that is circulated.  It’s usefulness is not simply created by the sender and consumed by the receiver, but rather passed from one person to another, and then another.  The faster you can communicate recognition around your community, the more utility you can get out of even a small amount of it. Fast communications, like IRC, phone calls or in-person meetups let you give and receive a higher volume of recognition than slower forms, like email or blog posts. But speed is only one part, and faster isn’t necessarily better.

Thoughtfulness

Where speed emphasizes quantity, thoughtfulness is a measure of the quality of communication, and that directly affects the value of recognition given. Thoughtful communications require consideration upon both receiving and replying. Messages are typically longer, more detailed, and better presented than those that emphasize speed. As a result, they are also usually a good bit slower too, both in the time it takes for a reply to be made, and also the speed at which a full conversation happens. An IRC meeting can be done in an hour, where an email exchange can last for weeks, even if both end up with the same word-count at the end.

Discoverability

The third point on our communication triangle, discoverability, is a measure of how likely it is that somebody not immediately involved in a conversation can find out about it. Because recognition is a social good, most of it’s value comes from other people knowing who has given it to whom. Discoverability acts as a multiplier (or divisor, if done poorly) to the original value of recognition.

There are two factors to the discoverability of communication. The first, accessibility, is about how hard it is to find the conversation. Blog posts, or social media posts, are usually very easy to discover, while IRC chats and email exchanges are not. The second factor, longevity, is about how far into the future that conversation can still be discovered. A social media post disappears (or at least becomes far less accessible) after a while, but an IRC log or mailing list archive can stick around for years. Unlike the three properties of communication, however, these factors to discoverability do not require a trade off, you can have something that is both very accessible and has high longevity.

Finding Balance

Most communities will have more than one method of communication, and a healthy one will have a combination of them that compliment each other. This is important because sometimes one will offer a more productive use of your recognition than another. Some contributors will respond better to lots of immediate recognition, rather than a single eloquent one. Others will respond better to formal recognition than informal.  In both cases, be mindful of the multiplier effect that discoverability gives you, and take full advantage of opportunities where that plays a larger than usual role, such as during an official meeting or when writing an article that will have higher than normal readership.

Calif. Court Rules Businesses Must Reimburse Cell Phone Bills

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 2:45md
New submitter dszd0g writes The Court of Appeal of the State of California has ruled in Cochran v. Schwan's Home Service that California businesses must reimburse employees who BYOD for work. "We hold that when employees must use their personal cell phones for work-related calls, Labor Code section 2802 requires the employer to reimburse them. Whether the employees have cell phone plans with unlimited minutes or limited minutes, the reimbursement owed is a reasonable percentage of their cell phone bills." Forbes recommends businesses that require cell phone use for employees either provide cell phones to employees or establish forms for reimbursement, and that businesses that do not require cell phones establish a formal policy.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 2:04md
redletterdave (2493036) writes "When Steve Ballmer announced he was stepping down from Microsoft's board of directors, he cited a fall schedule that would "be hectic between teaching a new class and the start of the NBA season." It turns out Ballmer will teach an MBA class at Stanford's Graduate School of Business in the fall, and a class at USC's Marshall School of Business in the spring. Helen Chang, assistant director of communications at Stanford's Business School, told Business Insider that Ballmer will be working with faculty member Susan Athey for a strategic management course called "TRAMGT588: Leading organizations." As for the spring semester, Ballmer will head to Los Angeles — closer to where his Clippers will be playing — and teach a course at University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business. We reached out to the Marshall School, which declined to offer more details about Ballmer's class.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Andrei Macavei: GSoC Final Report - Use GNOME Keysign to sign OpenPGP keys

Planet GNOME - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 12:50md
I haven't blogged about my work progress lately but I had implemented most of the functionality I had planned in the start of GSoC.

Short description of the project
My project was to make an easy to use tool that will help the OpenPGP Keysigning process [1].
Geysign will take care of all the steps a user must do to get his key signed or sign another one's key  by automating the process while following the OpenPGP best practices.


What Geysign currently does:

  • Displays your personal keys from which you can choose one at a time and get it signed.
  • Creates a QR code from your key fingerprint that can be scanned. The fingerprint can also be typed if your device has no video camera available.
  • Uses avahi to publishes itself on the network and discover other Geysign services to allow something like a "plug and play" support (otherwise you would have to get the ip address and port manually).
  • When requested, starts a local http server that will listen for new connections to download the public key data.
  • Authenticates the received key data by checking if the scanned/typed fingerprint is the same with the on from the key (imported into a temporary keyring).
  • If the two fingerprint match, then it will proceed to sign the key and export it.
  • Email the key back to its owner (not yet implemented).

The last point will be done after GSoC as well as giving the app a new GUI. Until now I had cared more about the functionality of the app and less about how it looks. 
Here is a short demo of the app tested locally (unfortunately I didn't had anyone to test with).You can check the code on git repository [2]. I am glad to see people are interested in this as I already received a pull request from someone who wants to contribute to Geysign.




With this occasion I want to thank GNOME for sponsoring the accommodation to GUADEC, I enjoyed being there for the first time.
I also want to mention my mentor Tobias Mueller for his help. I really learnt a lot from him and he is such a nice guy. My work on Geysign will continue and I hope that in the future it will be integrated into Seahorse.
[1] Open PGP Web of Trust : https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/OpenPGP_Web_of_Trust[1] Git repo: https://github.com/andreimacavei/geysigning

Moving toward smart and secure continuous software delivery

LinuxSecurity.com - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 12:45md
LinuxSecurity.com: It's no surprise that security and application development teams often find themselves locking horns. One wants applications and new features to roll out - and swiftly - and the other is often more concerned with keeping systems and data snug. At some organizations, as they embrace more agile development and continuous integration/delivery methods, the tension runs even higher.

The First Particle Physics Evidence of Physics Beyond the Standard Model?

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 11:30pd
StartsWithABang writes It's the holy grail of modern particle physics: discovering the first smoking-gun, direct evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. Sure, there are unanswered questions and unsolved puzzles, ranging from dark matter to the hierarchy problem to the strong-CP problem, but there's no experimental result clubbing us over the head that can't be explained with standard particle physics. That is, the physics of the Standard Model in the framework of quantum field theory. Or is there? Take a look at the evidence from the muon's magnetic moment, and see what might be the future of physics.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Allan Day: New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

Planet GNOME - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 11:20pd

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release.

Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of use in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit.

It has been a long road, in which we have done a lot of testing and prototyping before incorporating new features into GTK+. As a result of that work, GTK+ provides a contemporary lexicon to draw on when designing and implementing applications, including header bars, popovers, switches, view switchers, linked and specially styled buttons, and much more.

There is a downside to all the experimentation that has been happening in software design in recent years, of course – it can often be a bewildering space to navigate. This is where the HIG comes in. Its goal is to help developers and designers take advantage of the new abilities at their disposal, without losing their way in the process. This is reflected in the structure of the new HIG: the guidelines don’t enforce a single template on which applications have to be based, but presents a series of patterns and elements which can be drawn upon. Each of these is accompanied by advice on when each pattern is appropriate, as well as alternatives that can be considered.

The HIG is also designed so that it can grow and evolve over time. The initial version that I have been working on covers the essentials, and there is a lot more ground to be covered. We want to assist people in finding the design that best fits their needs, and we want to make a whole range of creative solutions available.

In writing the HIG, I’ve made an effort to produce a document that is as useful to as many people as possible. While there is an emphasis on integration with GNOME 3, there should be useful material for anyone using GTK+ to create applications. It includes guidelines on creating more traditional desktop applications as well as newfangled ones, and includes advice for those who are responsible for GNOME 2 style apps. Likewise, the new HIG includes guidance on how to design effective cross-platform applications.

The new HIG wouldn’t have been possible without the help and hard work of many individuals. It incorporates updated material from the previous version, which was written by Seth Nickell, Calum Benson, Bryan Clark, Adam Elman, and Colin Robertson, many of whom recently helped us to relicense the original HIG.

Credit also has to go to those people who designed and developed all the new capabilities that are documented in the new HIG, including Jon McCann and Jakub Steiner on the design side, as well as the developer/designers who helped to test new patterns and add new capabilities to GTK+ – Cosimo Cecchi, Matthias Clasen, Carlos Garnacho, Alexander Larsson, Benjamin Otte, and many others.

I’d also like to thank the GNOME Documentation Team for their advice and assistance with proofreading.

This being the initial release, I’d love to hear feedback, and I’m sure that there’s plenty to be improved. If you’re interested, you can clone gnome-devel-docs and read the development version using Yelp.

Steve Kemp: Updating Debian Administration

Planet Debian - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 10:50pd

Recently I've been getting annoyed with the Debian Administration website; too often it would be slower than it should be considering the resources behind it.

As a brief recap I have six nodes:

  • 1 x MySQL Database - The only MySQL database I personally manage these days.
  • 4 x Web Nodes.
  • 1 x Misc server.

The misc server is designed to display events. There is a node.js listener which receives UDP messages and stores them in a rotating buffer. The messages might contain things like "User bob logged in", "Slaughter ran", etc. It's a neat hack which gives a good feeling of what is going on cluster-wide.

I need to rationalize that code - but there's a very simple predecessor posted on github for the curious.

Anyway enough diversions, the database is tuned, and "small". The misc server is almost entirely irrelevent, non-public, and not explicitly advertised.

So what do the web nodes run? Well they run a lot. Potentially.

Each web node has four services configured:

  • Apache 2.x - All nodes.
  • uCarp - All nodes.
  • Pound - Master node.
  • Varnish - Master node.

Apache runs the main site, listening on *:8080.

One of the nodes will be special and will claim a virtual IP provided via ucarp. The virtual IP is actually the end-point visitors hit, meaning we have:

Master HostOther hosts

Running:

  • Apache.
  • Pound.
  • Varnish

Running:

  • Apache.

Pound is configured to listen on the virtual IP and perform SSL termination. That means that incoming requests get proxied from "vip:443 -> vip:80". Varnish listens on "vip:80" and proxies to the back-end apache instances.

The end result should be high availability. In the typical case all four servers are alive, and all is well.

If one server dies, and it is not the master, then it will simply be dropped as a valid back-end. If a single server dies and it is the master then a new one will appear, thanks to the magic of ucarp, and the remaining three will be used as expected.

I'm sure there is a pathological case when all four hosts die, and at that point the site will be down, but that's something that should be atypical.

Yes, I am prone to over-engineering. The site doesn't have any availability requirements that justify this setup, but it is good to experiment and learn things.

So, with this setup in mind, with incoming requests (on average) being divided at random onto one of four hosts, why is the damn thing so slow?

We'll come back to that in the next post.

(Good news though; I fixed it ;)

Wouter Verhelst: Multiarchified eID libraries, now public

Planet Debian - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 10:30pd

Yesterday, I spent most of the day finishing up the multiarch work I'd been doing on introducing multiarch to the eID middleware, and did another release of the Linux builds. As such, it's now possible to install 32-bit versions of the eID middleware on a 64-bit Linux distribution. For more details, please see the announcement.

Learning how to do multiarch (or biarch, as the case may be) for three different distribution families has been a, well, learning experience. Being a Debian Developer, figuring out the technical details for doing this on Debian and its derivatives wasn't all that hard. You just make sure the libraries are installed to the multiarch-safe directories (i.e., /usr/lib/<gnu arch triplet>), you add some Multi-Arch: foreign or Multi-Arch: same headers where appropriate, and you're done. Of course the devil is in the details (define "where appropriate"), but all in all it's not that difficult and fairly deterministic.

The Fedora (and derivatives, like RHEL) approach to biarch is that 64-bit distributions install into /usr/lib64 and 32-bit distributions install into /usr/lib. This goes for any architecture family, not just the x86 family; the same method works on ppc and ppc64. However, since fedora doesn't do powerpc anymore, that part is a detail of little relevance.

Once that's done, yum has some heuristics whereby it will prefer native-architecture versions of binaries when asked, and may install both the native-architecture and foreign-architecture version of a particular library package at the same time. Since RPM already has support for installing multiple versions of the same package on the same system (a feature that was originally created, AIUI, to support the installation of multiple kernel versions), that's really all there is to it. It feels a bit fiddly and somewhat fragile, since there isn't really a spec and some parts seem fairly undefined, but all in all it seems to work well enough in practice.

The openSUSE approach is vastly different to the other two. Rather than installing the foreign-architecture packages natively, as in the Debian and Fedora approaches, openSUSE wants you to take the native foo.ix86.rpm package and convert that to a foo-32bit.x86_64.rpm package. The conversion process filters out non-unique files (only allows files to remain in the package if they are in library directories, IIUC), and copes with the lack of license files in /usr/share/doc by adding a dependency header on the native package. While the approach works, it feels like unnecessary extra work and bandwidth to me, and obviously also wouldn't scale beyond biarch.

It also isn't documented very well; when I went to openSUSE IRC channels and started asking questions, the reply was something along the lines of "hand this configuration file to your OBS instance". When I told them I wasn't actually using OBS and had no plans of migrating to it (because my current setup is complex enough as it is, and replacing it would be far too much work for too little gain), it suddenly got eerily quiet.

Eventually I found out that the part of OBS which does the actual build is a separate codebase, and integrating just that part into my existing build system was not that hard to do, even though it doesn't come with a specfile or RPM package and wants to install files into /usr/bin and /usr/lib. With all that and some more weirdness I've found in the past few months that I've been building packages for openSUSE I now have... Ideas(TM) about how openSUSE does things. That's for another time, though.

(disclaimer: there's a reason why I'm posting this on my personal blog and not on an official website... don't take this as an official statement of any sort!)

National Science Foundation Awards $20 Million For Cloud Computing Experiments

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 9:08pd
aarondubrow writes The National Science Foundation today announced two $10 million projects to create cloud computing testbeds — to be called "Chameleon" and "CloudLab" — that will enable the academic research community to experiment with novel cloud architectures and pursue new, architecturally-enabled applications of cloud computing. While most of the original concepts for cloud computing came from the academic research community, as clouds grew in popularity, industry drove much of the design of their architecture. Today's awards complement industry's efforts and enable academic researchers to advance cloud computing architectures that can support a new generation of innovative applications, including real-time and safety-critical applications like those used in medical devices, power grids, and transportation systems.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Gunnar Wolf: Walking without crutches

Planet Debian - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 7:34pd

I still consider myself a newbie teacher. I'm just starting my fourth semester. And yes, I really enjoy it.

Now, how did I come to teaching? Well, my training has been mostly on stages for different conferences. More technical, more social, whatever — I have been giving ~10 talks a year for ~15 years, and I must have learnt something from that.

Some good things, some bad habits.

When giving presentations, a most usual technique is to prepare a set of slides to follow/support the ideas. And yes, that's what I did for my classes: Since my first semester, I prepared a nice set of slides, thematically split in 17 files, with ~30 to ~110 pages each (yes, huge variation). Given the course spans 32 classes (72 hours, 2¼ hours per class), each slide lasts for about two classes.

But, yes, this tends to make the class much less dynamic, much more scripted, rigid, and... Boring. From my feedback, I understand the students don't think I am a bad teacher, but still, I want to improve!

So, today I was to give the introduction to memory management. Easy topic, with few diagrams and numbers, mostly talking about the intuitive parts of a set of functions. I started scribbling and shortening the main points on a piece of paper (yes, the one on the picture). I am sure I can get down to more reduction — But this does feel like an improvement!

The class was quite successful. I didn't present the 100% of the material (which is one of the reasons I cling to my presentations — I don't want to skip important material), and at some point I do feel I was a bit going in circles. However, Operating Systems is a very intuitive subject, and getting the students to sketch by themselves the answers that describe the working of real operating systems was a very pleasant experience!

Of course, when I use my slides I do try to make it as interactive and collaborative as possible. But it is often unfeasible when I'm following a script. Today I was able to go around with the group's questions, find my way back to the outline I prepared.

I don't think I'll completely abandon my slides, specially for some subjects which include many diagrams or pictures. But I'll try to have this alternative closer to my mind.

China Pulls Plug On Genetically Modified Rice and Corn

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 6:25pd
sciencehabit writes China's Ministry of Agriculture has decided not to renew biosafety certificates that allowed research groups to grow genetically modified (GM) rice and corn. The permits, to grow two varieties of GM rice and one transgenic corn strain, expired on 17 August. The reasoning behind the move is not clear, and it has raised questions about the future of related research in China.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








How Argonne National Lab Will Make Electric Cars Cheaper

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 4:09pd
ashshy writes Argonne National Lab is leading the charge on next-generation battery research. In an interview with The Motley Fool, Argonne spokesman Jeff Chamberlain explains how new lithium ion chemistries will drive down the cost of electric cars over the next few years. "The advent of lithium ion has truly enabled transportation uses," Chamberlain said. "Because if you remember your freshman chemistry, you think of the periodic table -- lithium is in the upper left-hand corner of the periodic table. Only hydrogen and helium are lighter on an atomic basis."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Study: Seals Infected Early Americans With Tuberculosis

Slashdot.org - Enj, 21/08/2014 - 1:56pd
mdsolar writes that a study suggests that tuberculosis first appeared in the New World less than 6,000 years ago and it was brought here by seals. After a remarkable analysis of bacterial DNA from 1,000-year-old mummies, scientists have proposed a new hypothesis for how tuberculosis arose and spread around the world. The disease originated less than 6,000 years ago in Africa, they say, and took a surprising route to reach the New World: it was carried across the Atlantic by seals. The new study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, has already provoked strong reactions from other scientists. "This is a landmark paper that challenges our previous ideas about the origins of tuberculosis," said Terry Brown, a professor of biomolecular archaeology at the University of Manchester. "At the moment, I'm still in the astonished stage over this."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Faqet

Subscribe to AlbLinux agreguesi - Site në gjuhë të huaj